WRESTLING


History-making female wrestler dies at 84

Lillian Ellison was known as the Fabulous Moolah

She got the nickname after saying she wrestled “for the money … for the moolah”

Was first woman inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame

From COLUMBIA, South Carolina, Lillian Ellison, professional wrestling’s Fabulous Moolah, has died. She was 84.

Professional wrestler Lillian “Fabulous Moolah” Ellison, seen here in 2001, died Friday.

Ellison died Friday, according to Dunbar Funeral Home in Columbia.

Born Mary Lillian Ellison in 1923, she was dubbed the Fabulous Moolah after saying she wrestled “for the money … for the moolah.”

She was a longtime champion and the first woman inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame. Her autobiography, “The Fabulous Moolah: First Goddess of the Squared Circle,” was published in 2003.

Her daughter, Mary Austin said her mother had six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, loved her family and wrestling.

“She was famous, but I never looked at her that way,” Austin told The State. “She was just Mom, someone that was always there for me. Someone I could turn to.”

Ellison grew up in the small Kershaw County community of Tookiedoo, the youngest of 13 children and the only girl. Austin said her mother had six grandchildren and six great grandchildren, loved her family and wrestling.

Her obituary from the funeral home lists 63 year old Katie Glass of Columbia as Ellison’s adopted daughter. Glass, known as “Diamond Lil,” was a professional midget wrestler for 25 years. She said she was just 17 when she moved to Columbia to live with Ellison and learn to wrestle.

“She just taught me the basics, the holds, how to get somebody down, lock them down and everything,” Glass told The State.

Glass said she will miss Ellison.

“It’s going to be hard, I’ll tell you,” Glass said. “We’re doing the best we can. She was there for me. She’s a very nice lady. I’m going to miss her dearly and I love her very much.”
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Thank you AP and CNN News
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We will all miss Moola.

She was a pioneer for women in sports and wrestling…and a great example to us all…

Rest in peace, Fabulous Moola.
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

Here is an interesting side to the Chris Benoit tragedy…
For those of you who are fans and those of you who aren’t…

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http://chrisbenoitsinnocence.blogspot.com/2007/07/now-lets-look-at-what-we-know-about.html

Chris Benoit wasn’t the only Wrestler to die in an unusual way

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In from ATLANTA, Georgia, Investigators found testosterone, painkillers and anti-anxiety drugs in the body of professional wrestler Chris Benoit, who killed his wife and son last month before hanging himself in his Atlanta home, a medical examiner said Tuesday.

Investigators found steroids in the body of pro wrestler Chris Benoit, who killed his family in June.

Dr. Kris Sperry, Georgia’s chief medical examiner, said the body of Benoit’s wife, Nancy, also contained painkillers and anti-anxiety drugs.

Sperry said it’s likely the Benoits’ 7-year-old son, Daniel, was sedated at the time he was murdered, because a high level of the anti-anxiety drug Xanax was found in the boy’s system.

Xanax is not normally prescribed for children, Sperry said.

Chris Benoit’s body contained an “elevated” level of testosterone and therapeutic levels of Xanax and the painkiller hydrocodone, Sperry said.

But, he said, the level of testosterone revealed nothing conclusive about the wrestler’s state of mind before his death.

“There’s no reliable scientific data that says elevated levels of testosterone lead to psychotic rage,” Sperry said.

“The only thing we can ascertain is that this level of testosterone indicates that he had been using testosterone at least in some reasonably short period of time before he died,” he said. “It could be an indication he was being treated for testicular insufficiency.”

The investigators found no other drugs, including steroids, in Benoit’s body.

An official who is part of the investigation told CNN last month that Benoit’s name was on receipts that indicated he had purchased shipments of anabolic steroids and human growth hormones from Signature Pharmacy.

The Orlando, Florida, facility is at the center of a nationwide investigation into the sale of illegal steroids.

Phil Astin, Benoit’s personal doctor, has been indicted by a grand jury on seven charges of improperly dispensing and distributing painkillers and other drugs. Astin has been released on $125,000 bond and is under house arrest.

Although Benoit’s name was not mentioned in Astin’s indictment, his arrest stemmed from the investigation into the Benoits’ deaths.

“Through prescription records for Mr. Benoit maintained at a pharmacy in Fayetteville, Georgia, Dr. Astin was identified as prescribing, on average, a 10-month supply of anabolic steroids to Mr. Benoit every three to four weeks from May 4, 2006, through May 9, 2007,” the U.S. attorney’s office said.

Sperry said the body of Nancy Benoit also contained therapeutic levels of hydrocodone and Xanax, along with hydromorphone, which he said is a byproduct of the breakdown of hydrocodone.

Nancy Benoit’s blood alcohol level was .184, which is over the legal limit for intoxication, but Sperry said all of the alcohol found in her body “could come from the decomposition process.”

Sperry said investigators did not have enough specimen to test for steroids or human growth hormone in Daniel’s body. Daniel’s body showed signs of needle marks at the time of his death, but Sperry could not speculate why.

District Attorney Scott Ballard would not answer questions about the state of the investigation into the Benoits’ deaths, which he said is ongoing.

“We’d rather wait until we have more of the pieces so we can be more accurate and discuss more of a whole what happened,” he said. “We’re trying to envision as best we can what happened inside that household. This (the toxicology report) adds one element to all the other elements.”

Police have said Benoit, 40, strangled his wife, Nancy, and suffocated Daniel, then placed Bibles next to their bodies before hanging himself on a portable weight machine over the weekend of June 23.

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From ATLANTA, Georgia, Pro wrestler Chris Benoit’s father said Friday that he was eager to see whether chemical tests can help explain why Benoit killed his wife and son and committed suicide, acts that the wrestler’s father said he had no clue were coming.

Michael Benoit said by phone from his home in Alberta, Canada, that his family is shocked and in disbelief over the slayings.

“We have no understanding of why it happened,” he said. “We need some time to gather our thoughts and wait and see. There’s still more information that’s going to come out from toxicology tests that will give us some understanding of why this happened.”

Anabolic steroids were found in Benoit’s home, leading officials to wonder whether the drugs played a role in the killings, which took place last weekend. Some experts believe steroids cause paranoia, depression and violent outbursts known as “roid rage.”

Chris Benoit strangled his wife and 7-year-old son, placing Bibles next to their bodies, before hanging himself on the cable of a weight-machine in his home, authorities said. No motive was offered for the killings.

Investigators had not discovered the bodies Monday when someone altered Benoit’s Wikipedia entry to mention his wife’s death, authorities said.

An anonymous user with the same IP address as the person who made the edits confessed early Friday on an online discussion page attached to the Web site, saying the changes were based on rumors and speculation, not hard evidence.

The authenticity of the posting could not immediately be confirmed.

“I just can’t believe what I wrote was actually the case, I’ve remained stunned and saddened over it,” the user wrote.

According to Wikinews, an online news source connected to Wikipedia, the Internet protocol address of the individual is identical to that of the user who edited Benoit’s profile early Monday morning. An IP address is a unique series of numbers carried by every machine connected to the Internet.

Benoit’s page on Wikipedia, a reference site that allows users to add and edit information, was updated at 12:01 a.m. Monday, about 14 hours before authorities say the bodies were found. The reason he missed a match Saturday night was “stemming from the death of his wife Nancy,” it said.

Wikipedia confirmed the authenticity of the time stamp and said the entry was made by someone using an IP address registered in Stamford, Connecticut, where World Wrestling Entertainment is based. The anonymous user acknowledged being from Stamford, but claimed no connection to WWE.

Wikipedia referred further questions to authorities investigating the deaths. Messages left for Fayette County District Attorney Scott Ballard were not immediately returned Friday.

WWE attorney Jerry McDevitt said that to his knowledge, no one at the WWE knew Nancy Benoit was dead before her body was found Monday afternoon. Text messages released by officials show that messages from Chris Benoit’s cell phone were being sent to co-workers a few hours after the Wikipedia posting.

On Thursday, federal agents said they had raided the west Georgia office of a doctor who prescribed testosterone to Benoit, said agent Chuvalo Truesdell, a spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration. No arrests were made during the raid at Dr. Phil Astin’s office late Wednesday into Thursday.

Hours before the raid, Astin told The Associated Press he had treated Benoit for low testosterone levels, which he said likely originated from steroid use.

Among other things, investigators were looking for Benoit’s medical records to see whether he had been prescribed steroids and, if so, whether that prescription was appropriate, according to a law enforcement official speaking on condition of anonymity because records in the case remain sealed.

Astin prescribed testosterone for Benoit, a longtime friend, in the past but would not say what, if any, medications he prescribed when Benoit visited his office June 22.

Michael Benoit, who lives near Edmonton in Ardrossan, said the test results, which could take several weeks to be completed, “could give us closure.” He said his son had seemed fine when they spoke on Father’s Day, and had even said he regretted having to work instead of spending the day with his family.

“That really wouldn’t give you an indication of someone who would do what he did a week later,” the father said.
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Thank you AP News…
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My prayers go out to the family and friends.
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

…Wikipedia notes death of Benoit’s wife before body found…

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In from ATLANTA, Georgia, Investigators are looking into who altered pro wrestler Chris Benoit’s Wikipedia entry to mention his wife’s death hours before authorities discovered the bodies of the couple and their 7-year-old son.

Chris Benoit’s Wikipedia entry was altered early Monday to say that the wrestler had missed a match two days earlier because of his wife’s death.

A Wikipedia official, Cary Bass, said Thursday that the entry was made by someone using an Internet protocol address registered in Stamford, Connecticut, where World Wrestling Entertainment is based.

An IP address, a unique series of numbers carried by every machine connected to the Internet, does not necessarily have to be broadcast from where it is registered. The bodies were found in Chris Benoit’s home in suburban Atlanta, Georgia, and it’s not known where the posting was sent from, Bass said.

Chris Benoit strangled his wife and son during the weekend, placing Bibles next to their bodies, before hanging himself on the cable of a weight-machine in his home, authorities said. No motive was offered for the killings, which were discovered Monday.

Officials raid office of Chris Benoit’s doctor
Also Thursday, federal drug agents said they had raided the west Georgia office of a doctor who prescribed testosterone to Chris Benoit.

The raid at Dr. Phil Astin’s office in Carrollton began Wednesday night and concluded early Thursday, said agent Chuvalo Truesdell, a spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration. No arrests were made.

Hours before the raid, Astin told The Associated Press he had treated Chris Benoit for low testosterone levels, which he said likely originated from previous steroid use.

Among other things, investigators were looking for Benoit’s medical records to see whether he had been prescribed steroids and, if so, whether that prescription was appropriate, according to a law enforcement official speaking on condition of anonymity because records in the case remain sealed.

Astin prescribed testosterone for Chris Benoit, a longtime friend, in the past but would not say what, if any, medications he prescribed when Chris Benoit visited his office Friday.

State medical records show that Astin’s privileges were suspended for three months in 2001 at a Georgia hospital for “reasons related to competence or character.”

Astin did not return calls to his cell phone from the AP on Thursday.

Anabolic steroids were found in Chris Benoit’s home, leading officials to wonder whether the drugs played a role in the killings. Some experts believe steroids cause paranoia, depression and violent outbursts known as “roid rage.”

Fayette County District Attorney Scott Ballard said in a statement Thursday that he could not immediately comment on the raid.

Chris Benoit’s page on Wikipedia, a reference site that allows users to add and edit information, was updated at 12:01 a.m. Monday, about 14 hours before authorities say the bodies were found. The reason he missed a match Saturday night was “stemming from the death of his wife Nancy,” it said.

Reporters informed the Fayette County district attorney’s office of the posting Thursday, and the agency forwarded the information to sheriff’s investigators, who are looking into it, a legal assistant said in an e-mail to the AP.

WWE attorney Jerry McDevitt said that to his knowledge, no one at the WWE knew Nancy Benoit was dead before her body was found Monday afternoon. Text messages released by officials show that messages from Chris Benoit’s cell phone were being sent to co-workers a few hours after the Wikipedia posting.

WWE employees are given WWE e-mail addresses, McDevitt said, though he did not know whether Chris Benoit had one.

“I have no idea who posted this,” McDevitt said. “It’s at least possible Chris Benoit may have sent some other text message to someone that we’re unaware of. We don’t know if he did. The phone is in the possession of authorities.”

On Thursday afternoon, the Wikipedia page about Chris Benoit carried a note stating that editing by unregistered or newly registered users was disabled until July 8 because of vandalism.

In other developments Thursday, Ballard told the AP that 10 empty beer cans were found in a trash can in the Benoit home. An empty wine bottle was found a few feet from where Chris Benoit hanged himself, Ballard said.

It could take several weeks for toxicology tests to be completed on Chris Benoit to see what substances, if any, were in his system.

Chris Benoit took four months off from work in 2006 for undisclosed personal reasons, McDevitt said.

“He was feeling depressed, that kind of thing,” McDevitt said.

In the days before the killings, Chris Benoit and his wife argued over whether he should stay home more to take care of their mentally retarded 7-year-old son, according to an attorney for the WWE wrestling league.

The child had a rare medical condition called Fragile X Syndrome, an inherited form of mental retardation often accompanied by autism.

Chris Benoit’s father, Michael Benoit, declined to comment on the slayings when reached Thursday by telephone in Alberta, Canada. Funeral arrangements were incomplete.
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Thank you AP News for this report.
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Pharmacueticals are just “legal” drugs!

Yet the government has taken Marijanna off the market to people who are dying, going thru Chemo and have severe health problems…and it is natural!

They have also taken Stem cell research and vetoed it…thank you Pres Bush for stopping what could have helped so many of us out here, who have devestating, cronic, terminal illnesses!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

‘Roid rage’ questions surround Benoit murder-suicide

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In from FAYETTEVILLE, Georgia, the discovery of anabolic steroids in pro-wrestler Chris Benoit’s home has raised speculation that the performance-enhancing drugs may be linked to his death and the killings of his wife and young son.

The 40-year-old champion strangled his wife, Nancy Benoit, and suffocated his 7-year-old son Daniel, authorities said, before he hanged himself on a portable weight machine inside his lavish home outside Atlanta. Police have said no motive has been determined.

“A lot of prescription medication” was found in the home, including anabolic steroids, said Fayette County Sheriff Lt. Tommy Pope.

But authorities were still waiting on toxicology reports, which could take several weeks, to determine what, if any, medication was found in the bodies.

Chris Benoit was a pro-wrestler for 22 years and star of World Wrestling Entertainment, which strongly denounced any suggestion that steroid use could be connected to the tragedy.

The WWE said Benoit tested negative for drugs during an independently administered evaluation on April 10.

CNN Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta said Wednesday that it may never be known whether the deaths were linked to steroids or so-called “roid-rage.”

“The drugs said to be found in the home are a synthetic form of testosterone,” Gupta said. “A lot of people use it to build muscle mass, but there are long standing known relationships between the steroids and roid rage. It could lead to psychosis and anti-social behavior and depression.”

But the WWE said evidence gathered in the investigation indicates “deliberation, not rage.”

“The wife’s feet and hands were bound and she was asphyxiated, not beaten to death,” said a statement posted on the company’s Web site. “By the account of the authorities, there were substantial periods of time between the death of the wife and the death of the son, again suggesting deliberate thought, not rage.”

Investigators found the bodies of Nancy and Daniel Benoit with Bibles placed next to them, authorities have said. “The presence of a Bible by each is also not an act of rage,” said the WWE.

Former professional wrestler Del Wilkes said athletes use steroids to gain strength and size, which are key to success in the wrestling world. But he warned that the drugs sometimes come with “moments of uncontrollable rage.”

“You can feel it coming on but there’s nothing you can do about it,” Wilkes said. “The next thing you know, a minor argument has gone into a full-fledged rage, when you’ve got your hands around somebody’s neck. You’re in a fight and doing things you wouldn’t normally do.”

Wilkes also said the drugs can also cause “tremendous” depression “when guys are coming off steroids after they’ve been on it for a long period of time.”

An official who is part of the investigation told CNN that Benoit’s name was on receipts that indicated he had purchased shipments of anabolic steroids and human growth hormones from Signature Pharmacy, an Orlando, Florida, facility that is at the center of a nationwide investigation into the sale of illegal steroids.

As the investigation unfolded Wednesday, details about events inside the home began to emerge.

Needle marks were found in little Daniel’s arm, said Fayette County District Attorney Scott Ballard. He said authorities suspect “that the boy had been taking growth hormones for quite some time,” and are hoping to prove that with toxicology. The boy, Ballard said, was diagnosed with a form of dwarfism.

Daniel was found face down on his bed, but authorities said they do not know whether he was sleeping when he was killed. Ballard said authorities believe the child was asphyxiated using a choke hold. Benoit hung himself using the cord on a portable weight machine, Ballard said.

Ballard said Nancy Benoit’s body was found face down on the floor in an upstairs family room, wrapped in a blanket with her feet and wrists bound and blood under her head.

Two days before Benoit and his family were found dead, the wrestler told co-workers by phone his wife and son were sick with food poisoning and he had been having a stressful day, according to the WWE.

Chris Benoit left no suicide note, Pope said, but had sent text messages to a co-worker early Sunday, which was received several hours later. He refused to divulge the contents of the messages.

The WWE, however, said the five text messages were sent to co-workers between 3:51 a.m. and 3:58 a.m. using both Chris Benoit’s and Nancy Benoit’s cell phones. Four of them were the Benoits’ address; the fifth said that the family’s dogs were in the enclosed pool area and noted a garage side door was open.

The WWE said it made numerous attempts to contact Chris Benoit at his home and at Atlanta-area hospitals. At 12:30 p.m. on Monday, it learned of the text messages and contacted police, the statement said.

“In a community like this, it’s just bizarre to have a murder-suicide, certainly involving the death of a 7-year-old child,” Ballard told reporters. “I think that’s what I’m struck by most … there’s a 7-year-old boy who is dead.”

Chris Benoit once had been arrested on a charge of driving under the influence in another Fayette County jurisdiction, authorities said, but had no other criminal record.

CNN learned that divorce papers for the couple were filed in Fayette County in 2003, but the divorce never took place. Ballard said it was his understanding that a protection order was sought in 2003, but later dismissed. He had he had not seen the filings.
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Thank you CNN News and CNN’s Rusty Dornin and Adam Reiss, who contributed to this report.
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Thousands and thousands die each year from PHARMACEUTICALS. This was three deaths that could have been saved or avoided.

BE careful Baby Boomers…read the labels…there is a reaason they call them “warnings”! If those prescriptions are toxic or deadly…don’t take them! You are slowly being poisoned to death.

Lupus is inflamed by pharmaceuticals…for every action there is a reaction.

Go natural…medicine is only a science. Not a cure all!

There is a reason why the cancer and even the common cold hasn’t been cured…you can’t make any money on someone who is cured, now can you? But someone who is taking drugs for the rest of your life is a “gold mine”…can you imagine how much medicine is sold for the common cold alone???

Wise up America and Baby Boomers…

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

WWE star, Chris Benoit, killed family, then self…

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Chris Benoit was scheduled to perform at a pay-per-view event Sunday but backed out because of reported “personal reasons.”

From FAYETTEVILLE, Ga., Pro wrestler Chris Benoit strangled his wife, suffocated his 7-year-old son and placed a Bible next to their bodies before hanging himself with the pulley of a weightlifting machine, authorities said Tuesday.

Investigators found prescription anabolic steroids in the house and want to know whether the muscle man was unhinged by the drugs, which can cause paranoia, depression and explosive outbursts known as “roid rage.”

Authorities offered no motive for the killings, which were spread out over a weekend, and would not discuss Benoit’s motive or state of mind. No suicide note was found.

“I’m baffled about why anybody would kill a 7-year-old,” District Attorney Scott Ballard said. “I don’t think we’ll ever be able wrap our head around that.”

Benoit, a Montreal native whose nickname was “The Canadian Crippler,” was one of the stars of the WWE wrestling circuit and was known for his wholesome family man image. His wife, Nancy, was a wrestling stage manager who worked under the name “Woman.” They met and fell in love when their wrestling story lines intertwined.

When he won the world heavyweight championship, Benoit (pronounced ben-WAH) hoisted the belt over his head and invited his wife and child into the ring to celebrate.

Nevertheless, Nancy Benoit filed for a divorce in 2003, saying the couple’s three-year marriage was irrevocably broken and alleging “cruel treatment.”

She later dropped the complaint, as well as a request for a restraining order in which she charged that the 5-foot-10, 220-pound Benoit had threatened her and had broken furniture in their home.

In the divorce filing, she said Benoit made more than $500,000 a year as a professional wrestler and asked for permanent custody of Daniel and child support. In his response, Benoit sought joint custody.

The bodies were found Monday afternoon in three rooms of the house, off a gravel road.

Benoit’s wife, 43, was killed Friday in an upstairs family room, her feet and wrists were bound and there was blood under her head, indicating a possible struggle, Ballard said.

The son, Daniel, was probably killed late Saturday or early Sunday, the body found in his bed, Ballard said.

Benoit, 40, apparently killed himself several hours and as long as a day later, Ballard said. His body was found in a downstairs weight room, his body found hanging from the pulley of a piece of exercise equipment.

The prosecutor said he found it “bizarre” that the WWE wrestling star spread out the killings over a weekend and appeared to remain in the house for up to a day with the bodies.

Toxicology test results may not be available for weeks or even months, he said. As for whether steroids played a role in the crime, he said: “We don’t know yet. That’s one of the things we’ll be looking at.”

Neighbors said the Benoits led a low-key lifestyle.

“We would see Chris walking in his yard from time to time. He wasn’t rude, but he wasn’t really outwardly warm,” said Alaina Jones, who lives across the street.

Jimmy Baswell, who was Benoit’s driver for more than five years, placed a white wreath at the Benoits’ gate. “They always seemed like they were the happiest people,” he said.

World Wrestling Entertainment said on its Web site that it asked authorities to check on Benoit and his family after being alerted by friends who received “several curious text messages sent by Benoit early Sunday morning.”

The WWE, based in Stamford, Conn., said authorities asked that it not release further information on the deaths.

“WWE extends its sincerest thoughts and prayers to the Benoit family’s relatives and loved ones in this time of tragedy,” the company said in a statement on its Web site.

“He was like a family member to me, and everyone in my family is taking it real hard,” said fellow Canadian Bret Hart, a five-time champion with the World Wrestling Federation. The federation has since changed its name to World Wrestling Entertainment.

Benoit had maintained a home in Atlanta from the time he wrestled for the defunct World Championship Wrestling. The Fayette County Tax Assessors Office lists the value of the house, on more than 8.5 acres, at nearly $900,000.

The WWE canceled its live “Monday Night RAW” card in Corpus Christi, Texas, and USA Network aired a three-hour tribute to Benoit in place of the scheduled wrestling telecast.

Benoit had two other children from a prior relationship.
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Thank AP News…
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Hello Baby Boomers,

This is what pharmacueticals can do to you…
Go natural…man made chemicals are not natural.
Do you think Moses had a pharmacy in the desert?

And what…just if…he didn’t do it…what if there is a killer out there who is killing Wrestlers? Wasn’t there a wrestler found not long ago in a hotel dead? There is a huge amount of serial killers out there. The more people there are the more stranger then fact things happen…

Gives one points to ponder, don’t you think? MMMMmmmm…

~The Baby Boomer Queen~