Support the TROOPS


The American War: The U.S. in Vietnam

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Pinky and Bunny explain “The American War: The U.S. in Vietnam”

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You should not watch the first you tube with out watching the second.

Agent Orange and it’s effects…

To this day, I still hear opinions about Vietnam. That there was no such thing as Agent Orange and that they do not understand why Vietnam Veterans have P.T.S. If you look to see the madness…it, to me is quite understandable and that our soldiers were effected with Agent Orange as well. Germicides do not know the difference between a Vietnamese or an American.

I see Iraq as I did Vietnam…where are the weapons of mass destruction? I only see a war that was NOT NECESSARY!

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I pray for World Peace on Easter,
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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In WASHINGTON…Protesters blocked traffic and government buildings in Washington, acted out a Baghdad street scene in Syracuse, N.Y., and banged drums in a parade through San Francisco on Wednesday to mark the fifth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

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Protesters blocked traffic and government buildings in Washington, acted out a Baghdad street scene in Syracuse, N.Y., and banged drums in a parade through San Francisco on Wednesday to mark the fifth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

In other, more somber observances, organizers set up a 2 mile display of about 4,000 T~shirts in Cincinnati, meant to symbolize the members of the U.S. military killed in Iraq, while in Louisville, Ky., demonstrators lined rows of military boots, sandals and children’s tennis shoes on the steps of a courthouse.

Laurie Wolberton of Louisville, Ky., whose son just finished an Army tour of duty in Iraq, said she fears the worsening U.S. economy has caused Americans to forget about the war.

“We’re not paying attention anymore,” she said. “My son has buried his friends. He’s given eulogies, he’s had to go through things no one should have to go through, and over here they’ve forgotten. They just go shopping instead.”

On previous anniversaries, tens of thousands of people marched through major U.S. cities, and more than 100,000 gathered on several occasions leading up to the invasion.

Only a few hundred mustered for one of Wednesday’s largest gatherings, in Washington, the crowds’ size perhaps kept in check by a late winter storm system that stretched the length of the country.

Dozens of people were arrested, most of them at demonstrations in San Francisco, Washington and Syracuse.

At the Internal Revenue Service building in the nation’s capital, about 100 protesters led by a marching band gathered at the main entrance. Several jumped barricades and sat down in front of the doors and were immediately detained. The demonstrators said they were focusing on the IRS, among other institutions, because it gathers taxes used to fund the war.

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Brian Bickett, 29, was among the first arrested. The high school theater teacher from New York City said he had never engaged in civil disobedience before.

“We need to find lots of different ways to resist the war, and I decided to try this,” he said.

About 20 protesters were arrested about a block from the U.S. Capitol after blocking traffic. In some cases, police had to drag the protesters off the street.

In Syracuse, police arrested 20 protesters who blocked traffic by creating a mock Baghdad street scene. One person dressed in camouflage lay on the ground. Another was covered in a white sheet with red markings and a woman leaned over as if grieving. They were from a group of more than 100 demonstrators who marched downtown in a steady rain over the lunch hour.

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In Chicopee, Mass., eight people were arrested when they blocked a gate at Westover Air Reserve Base, police said. Five people were arrested In Hartford, Conn., for blocking the front door of a federal courthouse.

On the West Coast, San Francisco police arrested about 100 protesters by early afternoon for blocking traffic and chaining themselves to buildings, police said.

The rallies, which drew hundreds to the city’s busy financial district, were mostly peaceful, though some demonstrators threw glass Christmas ornaments filled with paint at police, said Sgt. Steve Mannina, a San Francisco police spokesman.

Black balloons were tied to trees along San Francisco’s main downtown thoroughfare, and protesters at a table offered coffee, oranges and “unhappy birthday cake” to passers-by.

A few hundred protesters banging drums and waving banners that read “Was it worth it” took to the streets for a parade that blocked morning traffic.

In Anchorage, Alaska, vandals dumped a gallon of red paint on a war veterans memorial, police spokesman Lt. Paul Honeman said.

Demonstrators also converged in Ohio, where more than 20 vigils, rallies, marches and other events were planned.

In New York City, women sang songs and counted out the war dead outside the military recruiting station in Times Square, which was recently the target of a bomb.

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Half a dozen war protesters in Miami dressed in black placed flowers outside the U.S. Southern Command during rush-hour Wednesday morning.

Outside a military recruitment office in Washington, protesters were met by a handful of counterdemonstrators, one of several shows of support for the war and the troops.

Colby Dillard, who held a sign reading, “We support our brave military and their just mission,” pointed to some red paint that one of the war protesters had splattered on the sidewalk.

“The same blood was spilled to give you the right to do what you’re doing,” said Dillard, who said he served in Iraq in 2003.

Earlier, about 150 people, mostly with the group Veterans for Peace, marched down Independence Avenue. Many of them carried upside~down American flags, which they said symbolized a nation in distress.

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Daniel Black, who was stationed in Fallujah with the Marines in 2004, said he came to believe the war was a mistake after he returned.

“The more I read the more it just didn’t add up,” said the 25 year old, a student at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

A couple of miles away at the American Petroleum Institute, protesters chanted “No blood for oil!” and tried to block traffic by sitting in the street and linking arms. At least once, they were dragged away by police.

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Vandals in Milwaukee damaged the front door of an Army recruiting center and spray painted anti~war graffiti across its front windows. Milwaukee police said the vandalism occurred Monday night or Tuesday.

The Iraq war has been unpopular both abroad and in the United States, although an Associated Press-Ipsos poll in December showed that growing numbers think the U.S. is making progress and will eventually be able to claim some success in Iraq.
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Thank you AP NEWS, Sarah Karush, AP writer and those who contributing to this report: Associated Press writers Karen Mahabir in Washington; Dave Collins in Hartford, Conn.; Laura Wides-Munoz in Miami; William Kates in Syracuse, N.Y.; Marcus Wohlsen in San Francisco; Dinesh Ramde in Milwaukee; Stephanie Reitz in Springfield, Mass.; Will Graves in Louisville, Ky.; and Deepti Hajela in New York.
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Gainesvilee, Florida…Uof F
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Reporting from Gainesville, Florida, and the University of Florida…The Baby Boomer Queen is pleased to report that the peace~niks were on their corner of University and 13th. They varied from age and size but the hearts were all the same. The majority that I saw were Baby Boomers.

There are still those of us who pray for peace and still make a stand for it.

It was interesting to see those that went by with their horns honking, with their fists raised and those that went by with their horns honking and their peace fingers up.

Bring our soilders home…but not in baskets or strechers!

Peace out
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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From TAMPA Florida, Harry Richard Landis, who enlisted in the Army in 1918 and was one of only two known surviving U.S. veterans of World War I, has died. He was 108.

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Harry Richard Landis, one of only two surviving vets of WWI, died Monday at 108.

Landis, who lived at a Sun City Center nursing home, died Monday, according to the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.

The remaining U.S. veteran is Frank Buckles, 107, of Charles Town, West Virginia, according the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition, John Babcock of Spokane, Washington, 107, served in the Canadian army and is the last known Canadian veteran of the war.

Another World War I vet, Ohioan J. Russell Coffey, died in December at 109. The last known German World War I veteran, Erich Kaestner, died New Year’s Day at 107.

Landis trained as a U.S. Army recruit for 60 days at the end of the war and never went overseas. But the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs counts him among the 4.7 million men and woman who served during the Great War.

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The last time a known U.S. veteran of a war died was September 10, 1992, when Spanish~American War veteran Nathan E. Cook passed away at age 106.

In an interview with The Associated Press in April in his Sun City Center apartment, Landis recalled that his time in the Student Army Training Corps involved a lot of marching.

“I don’t remember too much about it,” said Landis, who enlisted while in college in Fayette, Missouri, at age 18. “We went to school in the afternoon and drilled in the morning.”

They often drilled in their street clothes.

“We got our uniforms a bit at a time. Got the whole uniform just before the war ended,” Landis said. “Fortunately, we got our great coats first. It was very cold out there.

He told reporters in earlier interviews that he spent a lot of time cleaning up a makeshift sick ward and caring for recruits sickened by an influenza pandemic.

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When asked whether he had wanted to get into the fight, Landis said, “No.”

When the war ended on November 11, 1918, Landis recalled a final march with his unit.

“We went down through the girls college, marching down the street. We got down to the courthouse square and there was a wall around this courthouse. We got to the wall and (the drill instructor) didn’t know what to do and we were hup, two, three, four, hup, two, three, four,” Landis said, laughing at the memory. “Finally, we jumped up on the wall and kept going until we got to the courthouse ~ hup, two, three, four ~ and he said dismissed.”

He said he and some fellow recruits piled into a car to go to the next town.

“What we did there, why we were there, I couldn’t tell you,” Landis said.

He signed up to fight the Germans again in 1941, but at age 42 was rejected as too old.

“I registered, but that’s all there was to it,” Landis said.

Landis was born in 1899 in Marion County, Missouri. He joined the Student Army Training Corps in 1918 but got out when the war ended.

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He was a manager at S.S. Kresge Co., which later became Kmart, in Niagara Falls, New York, and Dayton, Ohio. His fondest memory was taking golf vacations with three friends and their families, a tradition that ended more than five decades ago with the death of his best friend.

“We really looked forward to getting our old foursome together and going somewhere for a couple of weeks,” Landis said. “Sadly, my favorite best friend lived until he was only 60 years old. We were like brothers. We could talk about business, serious things and we could act like a couple of kids.”

Landis retired to Florida’s warmer climate in 1988 and lived in an assisted living center with his wife of 30 years, Eleanor.

His first wife, Eunice, died after 46 years of marriage. Landis had no children. He said he enjoyed a good game of golf until his health kept him off the course.

Landis laughed when asked the secret to his longevity.

“Just keep swinging,” he said.
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Thank you AP News

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Thank you for serving our country, Harry Richard Landis.

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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