PHARACEUTICALS KILL


UK’s Prince Philip admitted to hospital

LONDON, England, Prince Philip, the husband of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, was admitted to hospital on Friday with a chest infection, Buckingham Palace said.

Prince Philip married Queen Elizabeth in 1947.

The 86 year old prince, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, was taken to King Edward VII’s Hospital in London for assessment, the palace said, and all of his weekend engagements have been canceled. No further details were available.

The Prince was seen in public last week during French President Nicolas Sarkozy’s state visit to the UK.

He was due to join the Queen on a royal visit to Devon and Cornwall in southwestern England next week, as well as attending two functions at Windsor Castle. A spokesman for Buckingham Palace told the UK’s Press Association that none of his engagements next week has been canceled.

Prince Philip was born into the Greek royal family in 1921, only to be smuggled out of Greece a year later aboard a British Royal Navy vessel after the king of Greece, Constantine I, his uncle, was forced to abdicate amid political instability.

A great~great grandson of Queen Victoria and a descendant of the Danish royal family, he served in the Royal Navy during World War II, rising to the rank of lieutenant.

In 1947, he married Queen Elizabeth, then heir to the throne, renouncing his Greek royal title to become a naturalized British citizen. Following Queen Elizabeth’s accession to the throne in 1952 he gave up his naval career to support her, in her royal duties.

Prince Philip is the patron of about 800 organizations and was the first president of the World Wildlife Fund. The prince has been a staunch defender of the royal establishment, turning against members of the family who have damaged its reputation.

Philip is not without controversy, however. He is renowned for making what some regard as inappropriate comments and was accused of insensitive remarks after the shooting of school children in Dunblane, Scotland, in 1996.

Conspiracy theorists have blamed him for having a role in Princess Diana’s death in 1997, although the judge at the inquest said this week there was no evidence to support that accusation.


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Thank you CNN News

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What do you think Royal Readers…Baby Boomers…did Prince Phillip have a hand in Princess Di’s MURDER!?!?!?!?!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

Leading doctors urged a return to older, tried and true treatments for high cholesterol after hearing full results Sunday of a failed trial of Vytorin.

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Results of a Vytorin trial showed the drug failed to improve heart disease though it reduced risk factors.

Millions of Americans already take the drug or one of its components, Zetia. But doctors were stunned to learn that Vytorin failed to improve heart disease even though it worked as intended to reduce three key risk factors.

“People need to turn back to statins,” said Yale University cardiologist Dr. Harlan Krumholz, referring to Lipitor, Crestor and other widely used brands. “We know that statins are good drugs. We know that they reduce risks.”

The study was closely watched because Zetia and Vytorin have racked up $5 billion in sales despite limited proof of benefit. Two Congressional panels launched probes into why it took drugmakers nearly two years after the study’s completion to release results.

Results were presented at an American College of Cardiology conference in Chicago Sunday and published on the Internet by the New England Journal of Medicine.

Doctors have long focused on lowering LDL or bad cholesterol as a way to prevent heart disease. Statins like Merck & Co.’s Zocor, which recently came out in generic form, do this, as do niacin, fibrates and other medicines.

Vytorin, which came out in 2004, combines Zocor with Schering~Plough Corp.’s Zetia, which went on sale in 2002 and attacks cholesterol in a different way.

The study tested whether Vytorin was better than Zocor alone at limiting plaque buildup in the arteries of 720 people with super high cholesterol because of a gene disorder.
The results show the drug had “no result…zilch. In no subgroup, in no segment, was there any added benefit” for reducing plaque, said Dr. John Kastelein, the Dutch scientist who led the study.

That happened even though Vytorin dramatically lowered LDL, fats in the blood called triglycerides and a measure of artery inflammation…CRP.

Some doctors noted that hormone pills for menopausal women and torcetrapib, a promising cholesterol drug Pfizer Inc. recently abandoned, also lowered cholesterol but were found in big studies to raise heart risks, not lower them.

Another ominous sign was the decision Friday by other researchers to expand enrollment in a more pivotal study of Vytorin to 18,000 people because early results suggest it will be harder than anticipated to see if it is any better than Zocor alone.

“It will be 2012, ten years after the drug was introduced before we know the answer,” said Dr. Steven Nissen, a Cleveland Clinic cardiologist who has no role in the studies and has criticized the drugmakers over the one reported Sunday.

Dr. Robert Spiegel, chief medical officer for Schering~Plough, said the study was done “with the highest integrity” and that doctors can believe the results “because of the time we took to make sure the data are right.”

“We were disappointed that it was not a very balanced panel discussion” by the heart doctors who urged their peers to focus on more established treatments.

However, Kastelein said the data were far more consistent than anticipated and ample to show that the drug simply did not work.

“A lot of us thought that there would be some glimmer of benefit,” said Dr. Roger Blumenthal, a Johns Hopkins University cardiologist and spokesman for the American Heart Association.

Many doctors have prescribed Vytorin without trying older, proven medications first, as guidelines advise. The key message from the study is “don’t do that,” Blumenthal said.

No one should ever stop any heart drug without talking with their doctors, heart specialists stressed.

However, doctors “should be thinking twice,” said Duke University cardiologist Dr. Robert Califf. He takes the drug himself because he cannot tolerate the high dose of statins he otherwise would need.

Dr. James Stein, director of preventive cardiology at the University of Wisconsin~Madison, said many doctors prescribe Zetia and Vytorin because they seem to be safe ways to get cholesterol down quickly, without annoying side effects like flushing that some other medicines carry.

Stein, who has consulted for Schering~Plough, said that after six years on the market, it would have been good to see better results on a drug so many doctors believed would help, “but the reason we do research is so we don’t have to rely on our ‘beliefs’ …we can rely on data.”

The New England Journal also published a report showing that Vytorin and Zetia’s use soared in the United States amid a $200 million advertising blitz. In Canada, where marketing drugs directly to consumers is not allowed, sales were four times lower.

Merck is based in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey; Schering~Plough, in Kenilworth, New Jersey.

In addition to the two Congressional committee probes, New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo subpoenaed the companies in a similar probe in January.

“While these corporations profited, Americans were left in the dark,” Cuomo said in a written statement Sunday.

“The millions who take this drug, taxpayers who subsidize its use through the Medicaid and Medicare programs, and Merck and Schering~Plough’s investors deserve to know why it took so long for the results to be made public. This new information underscores our concerns and advances our investigation, which we will pursue aggressively.”

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Thank you AP News

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There you have it Baby Boomers…another drug company that has been making millions from the public…while its medicine has not been doing what it is supposed to do…do you think there will be any money given back to those who have been taken advantage of??? Those whose health has not improved over the last two years? Those whose conditions has seen the flip side of improvement.

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This is what Vytorin is supposed to be…

What is Vytorin (Ezetimibe Simvastatin)?
Ezetimibe and simvastatin are cholesterol-lowering medicines. They reduce the amount of cholesterol (a type of fat) absorbed by the body and block the production of cholesterol in the body.

The combination of ezetimibe and simvastatin lowers “bad” cholesterol in the blood, (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) and raises “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). Lowering your LDL and raising your HDL cholesterol levels may reduce your risk of hardened arteries, which can lead to heart attacks, stroke, and circulation problems.
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These are SOME of the POSSIBLE side effects…since studies where not done properly…I am sure ther are more!

What are the possible side effects of Vytorin (Ezetimibe Simvastatin)?
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using ezetimibe and simvastatin and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness with fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine
decreased urine or rust-colored urine; or
blurred vision
Keep taking ezetimibe and simvastatin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea
cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose
tiredness
headache
skin rash or itching
joint pain, back pain
insomnia
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.
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CONTINUE IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THESE LESS SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS…ARE THEY CRAZY?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!
THEY CALL THIS MEDICINE???

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Remember that there are more people who die from pharmaceuticals then illegal drugs every year.

Eat well and exercise. It is NEVER to late! There are alternative out there!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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IN OKLAHOMA CITY, Oklahoma, Zach Dunlap says he feels “pretty good,” four months after he was declared brain dead and doctors were about to remove his organs for transplant.

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Dunlap was pronounced dead November 19 at United Regional Healthcare System in Wichita Falls, Texas, after he was injured in an all terrain vehicle accident. His family approved having his organs harvested.

As family members were paying their last respects, he moved his foot and hand. He reacted to a pocketknife scraped across his foot and to pressure applied under a fingernail. After 48 days in the hospital, he was allowed to return home, where he continues to work on his recovery.

On Monday, he and his family were in New York, appearing on NBC’s “Today.”

“I feel pretty good. but it’s just hard … just ain’t got the patience,” Dunlap told NBC.

Dunlap, 21, of Frederick, Oklahoma, said he has no recollection of the crash.

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“I remember a little bit that was about an hour before the accident happened. But then about six hours before that, I remember,” he said.

Dunlap said one thing he does remember is hearing the doctors pronounce him dead.

“I’m glad I couldn’t get up and do what I wanted to do,” he said.

Asked if he would have wanted to get up and shake them and say he’s alive, Dunlap responded: “Probably would have been a broken window that went out.”

His father, Doug, said he saw the results of the brain scan.

“There was no activity at all, no blood flow at all.”

Zach’s mother, Pam, said that when she discovered he was still alive, “That was the most miraculous feeling.”

“We had gone, like I said, from the lowest possible emotion that a parent could feel to the top of the mountains again,” she said.

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She said her son is doing “amazingly well,” but still has problems with his memory as his brain heals from the traumatic injury.

“It may take a year or more … before he completely recovers,” she said. “But that’s OK. It doesn’t matter how long it takes. We’re just all so thankful and blessed that we have him here.”

Dunlap now has the pocket knife that was scraped across his foot, causing the first reaction.

“Just makes me thankful, makes me thankful that they didn’t give up,” he said. “Only the good die young, so I didn’t go.”
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Thank you AP News
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Well, that is a close call that I don’t want to make!

Medicine is a science…and not an exact one at that!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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The American War: The U.S. in Vietnam

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Pinky and Bunny explain “The American War: The U.S. in Vietnam”

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You should not watch the first you tube with out watching the second.

Agent Orange and it’s effects…

To this day, I still hear opinions about Vietnam. That there was no such thing as Agent Orange and that they do not understand why Vietnam Veterans have P.T.S. If you look to see the madness…it, to me is quite understandable and that our soldiers were effected with Agent Orange as well. Germicides do not know the difference between a Vietnamese or an American.

I see Iraq as I did Vietnam…where are the weapons of mass destruction? I only see a war that was NOT NECESSARY!

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I pray for World Peace on Easter,
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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THIS IS A LONG POST…BUT I HIGHLY SUGGEST THAT YOU READ IT ~THE BABY BOOMER QUEEN~

A vast array of pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, anti~convulsants, mood stabilizers and sex hormones, have been found in the drinking water supplies of at least 41 million Americans, an Associated Press investigation shows.

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To be sure, the concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are tiny, measured in quantities of parts per billion or trillion, far below the levels of a medical dose. Also, utilities insist their water is safe.

But the presence of so many prescription drugs and over the counter medicines like acetaminophen and ibuprofen, in so much of our drinking water is heightening worries among scientists of long term consequences to human health.

In the course of a five month inquiry, the AP discovered that drugs have been detected in the drinking water supplies of 24 major metropolitan areas from Southern California to Northern New Jersey, from Detroit to Louisville, Ky.

Water providers rarely disclose results of pharmaceutical screenings, unless pressed, the AP found. For example, the head of a group representing major California suppliers said the public “doesn’t know how to interpret the information” and might be unduly alarmed.

How do the drugs get into the water?

People take pills. Their bodies absorb some of the medication, but the rest of it passes through and is flushed down the toilet. The wastewater is treated before it is discharged into reservoirs, rivers or lakes. Then, some of the water is cleansed again at drinking water treatment plants and piped to consumers. But most treatments do not remove all drug residue.

And while researchers do not yet understand the exact risks from decades of persistent exposure to random combinations of low levels of pharmaceuticals, recent studies, which have gone virtually unnoticed by the general public, have found alarming effects on human cells and wildlife.

“We recognize it is a growing concern and we’re taking it very seriously,” said Benjamin H. Grumbles, assistant administrator for water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Members of the AP National Investigative Team reviewed hundreds of scientific reports, analyzed federal drinking water databases, visited environmental study sites and treatment plants and interviewed more than 230 officials, academics and scientists. They also surveyed the nation’s 50 largest cities and a dozen other major water providers, as well as smaller community water providers in all 50 states.

Here are some of the key test results obtained by the AP:

Officials in Philadelphia said testing there discovered 56 pharmaceuticals or byproducts in treated drinking water, including medicines for pain, infection, high cholesterol, asthma, epilepsy, mental illness and heart problems. Sixty three pharmaceuticals or byproducts were found in the city’s watersheds.

Anti~epileptic and anti~anxiety medications were detected in a portion of the treated drinking water for 18.5 million people in Southern California.

Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey analyzed a Passaic Valley Water Commission drinking water treatment plant, which serves 850,000 people in Northern New Jersey, and found a metabolized angina medicine and the mood-stabilizing carbamazepine in drinking water.

A sex hormone was detected in San Francisco’s drinking water.

The drinking water for Washington, D.C., and surrounding areas tested positive for six pharmaceuticals.

Three medications, including an antibiotic, were found in drinking water supplied to Tucson, Ariz.

The situation is undoubtedly worse than suggested by the positive test results in the major population centers documented by the AP.

The federal government doesn’t require any testing and hasn’t set safety limits for drugs in water. Of the 62 major water providers contacted, the drinking water for only 28 was tested. Among the 34 that haven’t: Houston, Chicago, Miami, Baltimore, Phoenix, Boston and New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection, which delivers water to 9 million people.

Some providers screen only for one or two pharmaceuticals, leaving open the possibility that others are present.

The AP’s investigation also indicates that watersheds, the natural sources of most of the nation’s water supply, also are contaminated. Tests were conducted in the watersheds of 35 of the 62 major providers surveyed by the AP, and pharmaceuticals were detected in 28.

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Yet officials in six of those 28 metropolitan areas said they did not go on to test their drinking water, Fairfax, Va.; Montgomery County in Maryland; Omaha, Neb.; Oklahoma City; Santa Clara, Calif., and New York City.

The New York state health department and the USGS tested the source of the city’s water, upstate. They found trace concentrations of heart medicine, infection fighters, estrogen, anti~convulsants, a mood stabilizer and a tranquilizer.

City water officials declined repeated requests for an interview. In a statement, they insisted that “New York City’s drinking water continues to meet all federal and state regulations regarding drinking water quality in the watershed and the distribution system” regulations that do not address trace pharmaceuticals.

In several cases, officials at municipal or regional water providers told the AP that pharmaceuticals had not been detected, but the AP obtained the results of tests conducted by independent researchers that showed otherwise. For example, water department officials in New Orleans said their water had not been tested for pharmaceuticals, but a Tulane University researcher and his students have published a study that found the pain reliever naproxen, the sex hormone estrone and the anti-cholesterol drug byproduct clofibric acid in treated drinking water.

Of the 28 major metropolitan areas where tests were performed on drinking water supplies, only Albuquerque; Austin, Texas; and Virginia Beach, Va.; said tests were negative. The drinking water in Dallas has been tested, but officials are awaiting results. Arlington, Texas, acknowledged that traces of a pharmaceutical were detected in its drinking water but cited post 9/11 security concerns in refusing to identify the drug.

The AP also contacted 52 small water providers, one in each state, and two each in Missouri and Texas, that serve communities with populations around 25,000. All but one said their drinking water had not been screened for pharmaceuticals; officials in Emporia, Kan., refused to answer AP’s questions, also citing post 9/11 issues.

Rural consumers who draw water from their own wells aren’t in the clear either, experts say.

The Stroud Water Research Center, in Avondale, Pa., has measured water samples from New York City’s upstate watershed for caffeine, a common contaminant that scientists often look for as a possible signal for the presence of other pharmaceuticals. Though more caffeine was detected at suburban sites, researcher Anthony Aufdenkampe was struck by the relatively high levels even in less populated areas.

He suspects it escapes from failed septic tanks, maybe with other drugs. “Septic systems are essentially small treatment plants that are essentially unmanaged and therefore tend to fail,” Aufdenkampe said.

Even users of bottled water and home filtration systems don’t necessarily avoid exposure. Bottlers, some of which simply repackage tap water, do not typically treat or test for pharmaceuticals, according to the industry’s main trade group. The same goes for the makers of home filtration systems.

Contamination is not confined to the United States. More than 100 different pharmaceuticals have been detected in lakes, rivers, reservoirs and streams throughout the world. Studies have detected pharmaceuticals in waters throughout Asia, Australia, Canada and Europe, even in Swiss lakes and the North Sea.

For example, in Canada, a study of 20 Ontario drinking water treatment plants by a national research institute found nine different drugs in water samples. Japanese health officials in December called for human health impact studies after detecting prescription drugs in drinking water at seven different sites.

In the United States, the problem isn’t confined to surface waters. Pharmaceuticals also permeate aquifers deep underground, source of 40 percent of the nation’s water supply. Federal scientists who drew water in 24 states from aquifers near contaminant sources such as landfills and animal feed lots found minuscule levels of hormones, antibiotics and other drugs.

Perhaps it’s because Americans have been taking drugs and flushing them unmetabolized or unused in growing amounts. Over the past five years, the number of U.S. prescriptions rose 12 percent to a record 3.7 billion, while nonprescription drug purchases held steady around 3.3 billion, according to IMS Health and The Nielsen Co.

“People think that if they take a medication, their body absorbs it and it disappears, but of course that’s not the case,” said EPA scientist Christian Daughton, one of the first to draw attention to the issue of pharmaceuticals in water in the United States.

Some drugs, including widely used cholesterol fighters, tranquilizers and anti~epileptic medications, resist modern drinking water and wastewater treatment processes. Plus, the EPA says there are no sewage treatment systems specifically engineered to remove pharmaceuticals.

One technology, reverse osmosis, removes virtually all pharmaceutical contaminants but is very expensive for large scale use and leaves several gallons of polluted water for every one that is made drinkable.

Another issue: There’s evidence that adding chlorine, a common process in conventional drinking water treatment plants, makes some pharmaceuticals more toxic.

Human waste isn’t the only source of contamination. Cattle, for example, are given ear implants that provide a slow release of trenbolone, an anabolic steroid used by some bodybuilders, which causes cattle to bulk up. But not all the trenbolone circulating in a steer is metabolized. A German study showed 10 percent of the steroid passed right through the animals.

Water sampled downstream of a Nebraska feedlot had steroid levels four times as high as the water taken upstream. Male fathead minnows living in that downstream area had low testosterone levels and small heads.

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Other veterinary drugs also play a role. Pets are now treated for arthritis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, allergies, dementia, and even obesity, sometimes with the same drugs as humans. The inflation-adjusted value of veterinary drugs rose by 8 percent, to $5.2 billion, over the past five years, according to an analysis of data from the Animal Health Institute.

Ask the pharmaceutical industry whether the contamination of water supplies is a problem, and officials will tell you no. “Based on what we now know, I would say we find there’s little or no risk from pharmaceuticals in the environment to human health,” said microbiologist Thomas White, a consultant for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America.

But at a conference last summer, Mary Buzby, director of environmental technology for drug maker Merck & Co. Inc. said: “There’s no doubt about it, pharmaceuticals are being detected in the environment and there is genuine concern that these compounds, in the small concentrations that they’re at, could be causing impacts to human health or to aquatic organisms.”

Recent laboratory research has found that small amounts of medication have affected human embryonic kidney cells, human blood cells and human breast cancer cells. The cancer cells proliferated too quickly; the kidney cells grew too slowly; and the blood cells showed biological activity associated with inflammation.

Also, pharmaceuticals in waterways are damaging wildlife across the nation and around the globe, research shows. Notably, male fish are being feminized, creating egg yolk proteins, a process usually restricted to females. Pharmaceuticals also are affecting sentinel species at the foundation of the pyramid of life, such as earth worms in the wild and zooplankton in the laboratory, studies show.

Some scientists stress that the research is extremely limited, and there are too many unknowns. They say, though, that the documented health problems in wildlife are disconcerting.

“It brings a question to people’s minds that if the fish were affected … might there be a potential problem for humans?” EPA research biologist Vickie Wilson told the AP. “It could be that the fish are just exquisitely sensitive because of their physiology or something. We haven’t gotten far enough along.”

With limited research funds, said Shane Snyder, research and development project manager at the Southern Nevada Water Authority, a greater emphasis should be put on studying the effects of drugs in water.

“I think it’s a shame that so much money is going into monitoring to figure out if these things are out there, and so little is being spent on human health,” said Snyder. “They need to just accept that these things are everywhere, every chemical and pharmaceutical could be there. It’s time for the EPA to step up to the plate and make a statement about the need to study effects, both human and environmental.”

To the degree that the EPA is focused on the issue, it appears to be looking at detection. Grumbles acknowledged that just late last year the agency developed three new methods to “detect and quantify pharmaceuticals” in wastewater. “We realize that we have a limited amount of data on the concentrations,” he said. “We’re going to be able to learn a lot more.”

While Grumbles said the EPA had analyzed 287 pharmaceuticals for possible inclusion on a draft list of candidates for regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act, he said only one, nitroglycerin, was on the list. Nitroglycerin can be used as a drug for heart problems, but the key reason it’s being considered is its widespread use in making explosives.

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So much is unknown. Many independent scientists are skeptical that trace concentrations will ultimately prove to be harmful to humans. Confidence about human safety is based largely on studies that poison lab animals with much higher amounts.

There’s growing concern in the scientific community, meanwhile, that certain drugs or combinations of drugs may harm humans over decades because water, unlike most specific foods, is consumed in sizable amounts every day.

Our bodies may shrug off a relatively big one time dose, yet suffer from a smaller amount delivered continuously over a half century, perhaps subtly stirring allergies or nerve damage. Pregnant women, the elderly and the very ill might be more sensitive.

Many concerns about chronic low level exposure focus on certain drug classes: chemotherapy that can act as a powerful poison; hormones that can hamper reproduction or development; medicines for depression and epilepsy that can damage the brain or change behavior; antibiotics that can allow human germs to mutate into more dangerous forms; pain relievers and blood pressure diuretics.

For several decades, federal environmental officials and nonprofit watchdog environmental groups have focused on regulated contaminants, pesticides, lead, PCBs which are present in higher concentrations and clearly pose a health risk.

However, some experts say medications may pose a unique danger because, unlike most pollutants, they were crafted to act on the human body.

“These are chemicals that are designed to have very specific effects at very low concentrations. That’s what pharmaceuticals do. So when they get out to the environment, it should not be a shock to people that they have effects,” says zoologist John Sumpter at Brunel University in London, who has studied trace hormones, heart medicine and other drugs.

And while drugs are tested to be safe for humans, the timeframe is usually over a matter of months, not a lifetime. Pharmaceuticals also can produce side effects and interact with other drugs at normal medical doses. That’s why, aside from therapeutic doses of fluoride injected into potable water supplies pharmaceuticals are prescribed to people who need them, not delivered to everyone in their drinking water.

“We know we are being exposed to other people’s drugs through our drinking water, and that can’t be good,” says Dr. David Carpenter, who directs the Institute for Health and the Environment of the State University of New York at Albany.

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Good investigation AP NEWS and JEFF DONN, MARTHA MENDOZA and JUSTIN PRITCHARD, AP writers.

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There you go Baby Boomers…you can’t fool Mother Nature. Pharmaceuticals KILL, and do alternate with your body and your mind! That is what they are designed to do. Legal drugs kill more people than illegal drugs, each and every year! What is wrong with this picture?

Here is proof that they are effecting not only the enviroment and those of us who do not fall under the thumb of the large blood sucking, flesh eating pharmaceutical companies…

I could go on and on…but I am sure that those of you who read my posts know how I feel about this serious human and animal endangerment.

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

From Harrisburg, Pennsylvannia, Gorton’s Inc. recalled about 1,000 cases of frozen fish in 10 states Friday after confirming a Pennsylvania customer found pills in her food.

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Gorton’s said it ordered the recall as a precaution while a laboratory works to determine the nature of the pills. Those tests should be complete early next week.

“Obviously product alteration is a very serious matter,” said Jud Reis, vice president of marketing for the company, based in Gloucester, Massachusetts “We are conducting a full investigation into the source of the problem.”

Tracy Rowan of New Freedom, Pennsylvania, called police after she bit into one of the pills Sunday and found another on her daughter’s plate. On Friday, Reis said the material was some sort of pill, not compressed batter or bread crumbs.

Rowan described the pills as beige and aspirin size.

“It’s kind of frightening to not only find something in your mouth, a foreign object,” Rowan said Friday. “But then basically my heart stopped when my daughter said, ‘I have one in my mouth, too,’ and pulled it out.”

Rowan, her daughter and her 10 year old son were checked in an emergency room, then reported the incident to local police. They haven’t gotten sick, and Reis said the company knows of no other incidents.
Rowan said her daughter cooked the food and was adamant she did not alter the fillets.

The recall is for Gorton’s 6 Crispy Battered Fish Fillets, 11.4 ounces. The UPC Code is No. 44400157770, with a date code of 7289G1 and a “best if used by date of April 2009.”
The fish was sent to nine other states: Alabama, Delaware, California, Florida, Georgia, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas.

Consumers who purchased the fish can call Gorton’s at 1~800~896~9479.
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Thank you AP News
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Here is a case of someone pulling a prank and tons of food has been throw way…food that could have feed the homeless or the elderly. Many people, children included, go to bed hungry every night, here in AMERICA. WHAT A WASTE!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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From LOS ANGELES, California, an autopsy was scheduled Tuesday on the body of Christian Brando at the request of his family, the coroner’s office said.

Christian Brando was the eldest son of Hollywood legend Marlon Brando.

Brando, the troubled son of the late Marlon Brando, died Saturday at a Los Angeles hospital.

An attorney representing Marlon Brando’s estate said the 49 year old died from pneumonia.

His family requested the autopsy “based on his past drug history,” Los Angeles County coroner’s Lt. Fred Corral said Monday.

Corral said the autopsy would include a toxicology analysis.

Christian Brando’s ex~wife Deborah sued the executors of Marlon Brando’s estate Monday, claiming she is a victim of professional negligence, fraud and deceit.

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She claims that as part of a February 2007 settlement with Christian Brando in a domestic violence case, she would become assignee of her ex~husband’s rights and claims in the estate.

Deborah Brando accused producer Mike Medavoy and fellow executors Larry J. Dressler and Avra Douglas of executing a forged codicil to Brando’s will days before the actor’s death July 1, 2004.

“The will was forged … designed to separate and alienate [Deborah Brando] from others in Marlon Brando’s close and extended family, friends, and business acquaintances, and to keep them from challenging the will or trust,” the lawsuit said.

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Thank you AP News
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Well now, it appears that the voltures are out, circling…

I wonder if she gave that much attention to Christian when he was alive…???

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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