From Florida


From TAMPA Florida, Harry Richard Landis, who enlisted in the Army in 1918 and was one of only two known surviving U.S. veterans of World War I, has died. He was 108.

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Harry Richard Landis, one of only two surviving vets of WWI, died Monday at 108.

Landis, who lived at a Sun City Center nursing home, died Monday, according to the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.

The remaining U.S. veteran is Frank Buckles, 107, of Charles Town, West Virginia, according the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition, John Babcock of Spokane, Washington, 107, served in the Canadian army and is the last known Canadian veteran of the war.

Another World War I vet, Ohioan J. Russell Coffey, died in December at 109. The last known German World War I veteran, Erich Kaestner, died New Year’s Day at 107.

Landis trained as a U.S. Army recruit for 60 days at the end of the war and never went overseas. But the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs counts him among the 4.7 million men and woman who served during the Great War.

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The last time a known U.S. veteran of a war died was September 10, 1992, when Spanish~American War veteran Nathan E. Cook passed away at age 106.

In an interview with The Associated Press in April in his Sun City Center apartment, Landis recalled that his time in the Student Army Training Corps involved a lot of marching.

“I don’t remember too much about it,” said Landis, who enlisted while in college in Fayette, Missouri, at age 18. “We went to school in the afternoon and drilled in the morning.”

They often drilled in their street clothes.

“We got our uniforms a bit at a time. Got the whole uniform just before the war ended,” Landis said. “Fortunately, we got our great coats first. It was very cold out there.

He told reporters in earlier interviews that he spent a lot of time cleaning up a makeshift sick ward and caring for recruits sickened by an influenza pandemic.

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When asked whether he had wanted to get into the fight, Landis said, “No.”

When the war ended on November 11, 1918, Landis recalled a final march with his unit.

“We went down through the girls college, marching down the street. We got down to the courthouse square and there was a wall around this courthouse. We got to the wall and (the drill instructor) didn’t know what to do and we were hup, two, three, four, hup, two, three, four,” Landis said, laughing at the memory. “Finally, we jumped up on the wall and kept going until we got to the courthouse ~ hup, two, three, four ~ and he said dismissed.”

He said he and some fellow recruits piled into a car to go to the next town.

“What we did there, why we were there, I couldn’t tell you,” Landis said.

He signed up to fight the Germans again in 1941, but at age 42 was rejected as too old.

“I registered, but that’s all there was to it,” Landis said.

Landis was born in 1899 in Marion County, Missouri. He joined the Student Army Training Corps in 1918 but got out when the war ended.

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He was a manager at S.S. Kresge Co., which later became Kmart, in Niagara Falls, New York, and Dayton, Ohio. His fondest memory was taking golf vacations with three friends and their families, a tradition that ended more than five decades ago with the death of his best friend.

“We really looked forward to getting our old foursome together and going somewhere for a couple of weeks,” Landis said. “Sadly, my favorite best friend lived until he was only 60 years old. We were like brothers. We could talk about business, serious things and we could act like a couple of kids.”

Landis retired to Florida’s warmer climate in 1988 and lived in an assisted living center with his wife of 30 years, Eleanor.

His first wife, Eunice, died after 46 years of marriage. Landis had no children. He said he enjoyed a good game of golf until his health kept him off the course.

Landis laughed when asked the secret to his longevity.

“Just keep swinging,” he said.
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Thank you AP News

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Thank you for serving our country, Harry Richard Landis.

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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In LAS VEGAS, an angry judge doubled O.J. Simpson’s bail to $250,000 on Wednesday for violating terms of his original bail by attempting to contact a co~defendant in his armed robbery case.

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Simpson, clad in jail attire, grimaced as the amount was announced and meekly acknowledged that he understood.
“I don’t know Mr. Simpson what the heck you were thinking, or maybe that’s the problem, you weren’t,” Clark County District Court Judge Jackie Glass told Simpson.

“I don’t know if it’s just arrogance. I don’t know if it’s ignorance. But you’ve been locked up at the Clark County Detention Center since Friday because of arrogance or ignorance…or both.”

Glass said that the initial court order to not contact other defendants was clear and she warned that if anything else happened Simpson would be locked up.

Simpson was picked up by his bail bondsman, Miguel Pereira of You Ring We Spring, in Florida on Friday and was brought back to Nevada on allegations he violated terms of his release.

The district attorney charged that Simpson left an expletive laced phone message Nov. 16, telling Pereira to tell co~defendant Clarence “C.J.” Stewart how upset Simpson was about testimony during their preliminary hearing.

“I just want, want C.J. to know that … I’m tired of this [expletive],” Simpson was quoted as saying. “Fed up with [expletives] changing what they told me. All right?”

Pereira testified during the bail hearing but the recording was not played despite the prosecution’s attempt to do so. Simpson attorney Yale Galanter immediately said that Simpson made the call and the judge did not allow the recording to be heard.

Stewart and fellow co~defendant Charles Ehrlich did not have to appear for the hearing and remain free on bail.

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The three men pleaded not guilty Nov. 28 to kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, burglary, coercion and conspiracy charges. A kidnapping conviction could bring a life sentence with the possibility of parole. An armed robbery conviction carries mandatory prison time.

Three other former co~defendants have pleaded to lesser charges and testified against Simpson at a previous hearing.

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Simpson has denied any knowledge about guns being involved in the confrontation with memorabilia dealers Bruce Fromong and Alfred Beardsley. He has said he intended only to retrieve items that had been stolen from him by a former agent, including the suit he wore the day he was acquitted of murder in 1995 in the slayings of his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman.

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Thank you CNN, AP News and KEN RITTER, Associated Press Writer

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Do you think OJ has figured it out yet??? I don’t…

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~The Baby Boomer Queen~

Simpson, 60, arrived in Las Vegas on a commercial flight from Florida with his bail bondsman, Miguel Pereira. He was taken in handcuffs by a police escort to the Clark County Detention Center, where both he and Pereira ignored questions from reporters.

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Police said Simpson would be kept isolated from the other 3,300 inmates until a court hearing Wednesday, when Clark County District Attorney David Roger plans to request that Simpson’s bail be revoked and he be kept in jail until trial.

AP Photo: O.J. Simpson, right, is transferred to the he Clark County jail after he arrived at Los Vegas…
The prosecutor alleges that in a November voice message, Simpson told Pereira to contact co~defendant Clarence “C.J.” Stewart and express frustration about testimony given at the hearing where Simpson, Stewart and a third man were ordered to stand trial.

“I just want, want C.J. to know that … I’m tired of this [expletive],” Simpson is quoted as saying in a transcript that was included in Roger’s motion to revoke bail, filed Friday. “Fed up with [expletive] changing what they told me. All right?”

Simpson had been instructed by Las Vegas Justice of the Peace Joe M. Bonaventure in September not to have any contact with anyone involved in the case, not even by “carrier pigeon.”

Simpson’s lawyer denied the allegations.

“O.J. did not try to persuade anybody to contact a witness,” Yale Galanter told The Associated Press.

Simpson was freed Sept. 19 on $125,000 bail following his arrest on allegations he and several friends burst into a Las Vegas hotel room and robbed two sports memorabilia dealers at gunpoint.

His bond was revoked Friday by his bail bond company, said Officer Ramon Denby, a Las Vegas police spokesman.

Simpson has maintained that he was retrieving items that belonged to him. He and the two other men are scheduled to stand trial April 7.

The prosecutor alleges that Simpson left the voice message with Pereira for Stewart on Nov. 16, two days after Bonaventure ruled that Simpson, Stewart and Charles Ehrlich should stand trial on 12 charges, including kidnapping and armed robbery.

Roger’s three page motion alleges Simpson “committed new crimes,” without providing details or elaboration. Dan Kulin, a spokesman for Roger, declined to say whether new charges would be filed against Simpson.

Galanter said he believed the “new crimes” referred to allegations of witness tampering. Galanter called Pereira a member of Simpson’s defense team, and said he was “totally miffed” by the effort to use a tape of a permissible phone call to try to revoke Simpson’s bail.

“He was clearly voicing frustration to a member of the defense team who had been providing security, transportation and investigation services,” he said.

Galanter said Simpson stayed at Pereira’s home during the preliminary hearing, but said he thought the bondsman apparently changed sides.

“He is clearly now a witness for the prosecution,” Galanter said of Pereira. He said he intended to question the bondsman under oath Wednesday regarding the telephone message and how the tape recording came to be turned over to prosecutors.

Pereira did not respond to messages seeking comment. A bail bondsman at his business, You Ring We Spring, bail bonds in North Las Vegas, declined immediate comment.

Stewart’s lawyer, Jose Pallares, said Friday he had no knowledge that Simpson’s message ever got to Stewart.

Simpson, Stewart and Ehrlich each pleaded not guilty Nov. 28 to kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, burglary, coercion and conspiracy charges. A kidnapping conviction could bring a life sentence with the possibility of parole. An armed robbery conviction carries mandatory prison time.

Three other former co~defendants, Walter Alexander, Michael McClinton and Charles Cashmore, agreed to plea deals and testified against Simpson at the evidentiary hearing in Las Vegas.

Simpson has maintained that no guns were displayed during the confrontation, that he never asked anyone to bring guns and that he did not know anyone had guns. He has said he intended only to retrieve items that had been stolen from him by a former agent, including the suit he wore the day he was acquitted of murder in 1995 in the slayings of his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman.

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Thank you AP, CNN News and KEN RITTER, Associated Press Writer

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OJ, when are you ever going to learn…especailly in Las Vegas…

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

You know it’s July in Florida when:

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– Hot water comes out of both taps.

– You find out that a seatbelt buckle makes a pretty nice branding iron.

– The trees are whistling for the dogs.

– You find out that you can get sunburned through your car window.

– The birds need to use potholders to pull worms out of the ground.

– You burn your hand opening the car door.

– The temperature drops below 95 and you put on a sweater.

– You can make instant sun tea.

– Shade determines the best parking space, not distance.

– Farmers feed their chickens crushed ice to keep them from laying hard boiled eggs.

– When you step outside at 7:30 a.m., you break into a sweat.

– Potatoes cook underground. This is convenient because all you have to do is pull one out and add salt, pepper and butter.

– You discover that asphalt has a liquid state.

– You realize that it only takes two fingers to steer your car.

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