DIET


Lupus got its name from the Latin word for wolves, Canis Lupus. Lupus manifests it facial rashes, like facial markings of a wolf.

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MOST IMPORTANT: Finding the Right Doctor

You do not necessarily have to find a specialist to diagnose your lupus. A family practitioner, internist, or general practitioner can also diagnose the disease. However, when it comes to dealing with the variety of symptoms and side effects of lupus, you may end up visiting with a variety of physicians known as your treatment team.

For the most part you will end up seeing at least one of two specialists besides your current family doctor. If you have cutaneous lupus you will probably see a dermatologist to definitively diagnose your condition. A dermatologist is a doctor that specializes in skin disorders. However, you could also end up seeing an urologist, neurologist, cardiac specialist, and an orthopedic surgeon depending on your symptoms.

Yet when it comes to SLE, you will most likely be visiting with a rheumatologist. A rheumatologist is a doctor that specializes in treating arthritis, and other conditions of the joints, muscles, and bones. While these two medical specialties are focuses on symptoms that fit with your type of Lupus, there are some doctors that are more qualified than others, because they actually specialize in treating Lupus patients.

When you suspect that you have lLpus, you will probably start off working with your family doctor. He or she may recommend that you find a specialist, so you should know where you can find a Lupus doctor and how to choose the best doctor for you. Not every person’s disease travels the same path and people relate to doctors differently. Discuss your options with your family doctor to find someone who is well respected in the field but also fits with your payment options and personality. Also, be sure to check credentials and board certification. Do not be afraid to interview your doctors, because you cannot be intimidated about following your treatment.

Here are some resources that can help you find a specialist:

American Board of Medical Specialties:
http://www.abms.org/login.asp

American Medical Association:
http://www.ama-assn.org/

Lupus Foundation of America:
http://www.lupus.org/support/findadoctor.html

St. Thomas Lupus Trust (UK) :
http://www.lupus.org.uk

Preparing for the Consultation
Before you head out to discuss your Lupus with a specialist, you need to do some preparation on your own. Make sure you look up the doctor’s qualifications. There is no sense going to meet with a specialist that doesn’t specialize in treating Lupus. Also, talk to your insurance provider to if your visit is covered or what percentage will be covered.

Your medical history is also important prior to going in for your consultation. Start off by going through all of your prior doctor visits and write down any diagnoses and symptoms you have experienced. Write down a list of your medications. You should also write down some of your current symptoms like where you experience pain, how often, and how severe. Are there any triggers? What time of day is worse? Also, if you have any copies of your medical records, bring those with you. Finally, write down your family’s medical history, too.

You also need to write down some questions to ask your doctor. Why should you write them down? Sometimes the doctors will be giving you a lot of information, and you can often forget to ask something. If you take some time to write down your questions you will be less likely to forget something. Also, if you leave space, you can take notes so you don’t forget what the doctor is telling you.

Some of the questions you should ask when you are interviewing a potential specialist include:

How will you communicate with my other physicians?
Do you treat other patients with lupus?
What are your results in your other lupus patients?
Where will my tests be conducted?
How will your nurses be used in my care?
Have you ever worked with any of my other doctors?

When you finish “interviewing” the specialist, you should ask yourself the following questions to determine if this doctor is the right fit:

Did the doctor and the staff treat me with respect?
Was I given all the time I needed to ask questions and get answers?
Did the doctor appear knowledgeable about lupus?
Did the doctor and I communicate well?

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Thank you Freedon from Lupus
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Chosing the right Doctor is like chosing the right marriage partner…
When you talk to this Physican, ask them about the number one Super FOOD in the World the Acai Berry.
If they don’t tell you about all the great advantages to taking this fruit…then they are the wrong doctor! Medications are wrong for a Lupus patient…as drugs induce worse actions/reactions with your body.
If I can help you in any way…contact me…I will assist you in any way that I am able. I am NOT a Doctor, but I am a Lupus Survivor and I want you to be too!

http://www.MyMonaVie.com/SharonSutley

Smiles and world peace,
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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It is always worse when you lose a friend on a Holiday!

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They say that Holidays are pretty stressful for most…this pretty much proves that theory to be true!

Happy Holidays
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

What is Lupus?

It’s been said that understanding Lupus means understanding medicine. Lupus, also known by its formal name “Lupus Erythematosus,” is caused by factors that reflect the core of immune system functioning. Still, Lupus is actually difficult to diagnose. While over one million people suffer from Lupus in the US alone, it is a little publicized disease – despite the fact that it has more sufferers than leukemia, multiple sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, and muscular dystrophy combined.

Systemic Lupus

The simplest way to explain lupus is that the body becomes allergic to itself. The immune system overreacts to stimuli, resulting in too many antibodies being produced. This autoimmune disease then causes the high number of antibodies to attack normal tissue. While there are several different types of Lupus…including Systemic, Discoid, Neonatal, and Drug-Induced Lupus. Systemic Lupus is the most common form.

Systemic Lupus (SLE) is diagnosed by using specific criteria determined by the American College of Rheumatology. Despite the fact that he criteria are outlined, it can actually take along time to diagnose. While some tests help in the diagnosis, there is no one definitive test for SLE.

SLE symptoms can appear on the skin, as can be seen by the first four criteria. It can also cause major damage to the internal organs, as noted in the systemic criteria. Finally, the diagnosis is usually confirmed via at least one of the laboratory criteria, most often through the antinuclear antibody test, or ANA. While the ANA test tells a physician that there is a potential autoimmune disease, it does not give a definitive Lupus diagnosis alone. While 4 out of the 11 criteria are usually required for a lupus diagnosis, there are rare occasions when a diagnosis can be made with less.
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Thank you Freedom from Lupus
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Hello Baby Boomers

Though I am not a Doctor…I am a survivor if Lupus or should that read with Lupus…

If there is anything that I can help you with…PLEASE contact me…on or off line.

Though out my blog there are all kinds of reports on Lupus…just do a search.

What has helped me the most and a HUGE world of difference to me and my health is Mona Vie…I attack Lupus thru a NON-PHARMACUETICAL approach…since I am one of the Drug Induced Lupus Survivors.

http://www.MyMonaVie.com/SharonSutley

Just in from SYDNEY, Australian scientists are trying to give kangaroo~style stomachs to cattle and sheep in a bid to cut the emission of greenhouse gases blamed for global warming, researchers say.

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Thanks to special bacteria in their stomachs, kangaroo flatulence contains no methane and scientists want to transfer that bacteria to cattle and sheep who emit large quantities of the harmful gas.

While the usual image of greenhouse gas pollution is a billowing smokestack pushing out carbon dioxide, livestock passing wind contribute a surprisingly high percentage of total emissions in some countries.

“Fourteen percent of emissions from all sources in Australia is from enteric methane from cattle and sheep,” said Athol Klieve, a senior research scientist with the Queensland state government.

“And if you look at another country such as New Zealand, which has got a much higher agricultural base, they’re actually up around 50 percent,” he told AFP.

Researchers say the bacteria also makes the digestive process much more efficient and could potentially save millions of dollars in feed costs for farmers.

“Not only would they not produce the methane, they would actually get something like 10 to 15 percent more energy out of the feed they are eating,” said Klieve.

Even farmers who laugh at the idea of environmentally friendly kangaroo farts say that’s nothing to joke about, particularly given the devastating drought Australia is suffering.

“In a tight year like a drought situation, 15 percent would be a considerable sum,” said farmer Michael Mitton.

But it will take researchers at least three years to isolate the bacteria, before they can even start to develop a way of transferring it to cattle and sheep.

Another group of scientists, meanwhile, has suggested Australians should farm fewer cattle and sheep and just eat more kangaroos.

The idea is controversial, but about 20 percent of health conscious Australians are believed to eat the national symbol already.

“It’s low in fat, it’s got high protein levels it’s very clean in the sense that basically it’s the ultimate free range animal,” said Peter Ampt of the University of New South Wales’s institute of environmental studies.

“It doesn’t get drenched, it doesn’t get vaccinated, it utilizes food right across the landscape, it moves around to where the food is good, so yes, it’s a good food.”

It might take a while for kangaroos to become popular barbecue fare, but with concern over global warming growing in the world’s driest inhabited continent, Australians could soon be ready to try almost anything to cut emissions.

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Thank you AFP News
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Let me see…the Austailan drought is caused by bovine farts???

LOL

And eating cute kangaroos would solve some of that problem???

This is really word science!

Sorry Mates…no KANGAROO meat for this Baby Boomer!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

It may not be the most appetizing reading before a hearty holiday meal, but the New England Journal of Medicine is devoting part of its Thanksgiving issue to a giant hairball and not the feline kind.

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Doctors say this hairball removed from a woman’s stomach weighed 10 pounds.

The prestigious journal details the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old woman who consulted a team of gastrointestinal specialists.

She complained of a five-month history of pain and swelling in her abdomen, vomiting after eating and a 40 pound weight loss.

After a scan of the woman’s abdomen showed a large mass, doctors lowered a scope through her esophagus.

It revealed “a large bezoar occluding nearly the entire stomach,” wrote Drs. Ronald M. Levy and Srinadh Komanduri, gastroenterologists at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois.

For the uninitiated, a bezoar is a hairball.

“On questioning, the patient stated that she had had a habit of eating her hair for many years, a condition called trichophagia,” they wrote.

The woman underwent surgery to remove the mass of black, curly hair, which weighed 10 pounds and measured 15 inches by 7 inches by 7 inches, the doctors said.

Five days later, she was eating normally and was sent home.

A year later, the pain and vomiting were gone, the patient had regained 20 pounds “and reports that she has stopped eating her hair.”

Reached at his home in Chicago, Levy said he had no idea whether the journal’s timing of the publication on Thanksgiving was intentional.

Either way, he said, it would not affect the gastroenterologists’ holiday dinner plans, “We don’t get fazed by much.”
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Thank you CNN News
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I don’t know abotu the rest of you…but I am glad I didn’t eat my hair growning up!

If you want to see a pic of this hair ball, here is a link to it.

http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/11/21/hairball.case/index.html

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

The Baby Booper Quueen’s Holiday Apricot Cranberry Chutney

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I love cranberrys and there are so many ways to fix them…this is one of my favorites…

INGREDIENTS
1/4 cup diced dried apricots
2 large apple diced with the skin on [I like McIntosh apples]
1 (12 ounce) package fresh cranberries
1/2 cup raisins, dark or white
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 pinch ground cloves
1 cup water
3/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup of lemon juice
the grated skin of one orange
optional some orange juice~about two tablespoons
optional 1/2 cup of pecan pieces

DIRECTIONS

In a medium bowl, mix together the apricots, cranberries, raisins, apples, gratted skin of an orange, cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg and cloves.

In a medium saucepan, boil water and sugar, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved. Add the dried fruit mixture leomon juice and vinegar. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

Serve immediately, or refrigerate in a covered container.

I like this served on my apple, or mince meat pies with icecream.
you can also use some of the juice of the orange as well…not too much you don’t want to cut the apricot flavor.

And last but not least you can add pieces of pecan [or walnuts]…being a Southern cook I always add them. I like the crunch and the flavor that they add…

And last but not least you can add rubbarb to this recipe…I love rubbard…I would add a cup of died rubbarb and delete the apricots {or not…I love fruit!}.

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Happy Holidays
~Sharon~
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

Ancients knew chocolate was good…

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Residents of Central America were enjoying chocolate drinks more than 3,000 years ago, a half millennium earlier than previously thought, new research shows.

People were drinking chocolate in Central America more than 3,000 years ago, scientists say.

Archaeologists led by John Henderson of Cornell University studied the remains of pottery used in the lower Ulua Valley in northern Honduras about 1100 B.C.

Residue from the pots contained theobromine, which occurs only in the cacao plant, the source of chocolate, the researchers said in Monday’s online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The find dates the first use of chocolate to some 500 years earlier than previously known, they said.

The style of the pottery indicates that cacao was served at important ceremonies to mark weddings and births, according to the authors.
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Thank you AP News
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Like this isn’t something ever y woman in the US knows! LOL

Men, if your significant other, is having a bad day…give her chocolates…make life easier for your self.

DO NOT…repeat…DO NOT give it to your DOGS!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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