computer stuff and news


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THREE WOMEN, TWO YOUNGER, AND ONE BABY BOOMER WERE SITTING NAKED IN A
SAUNA.

SUDDENLY THERE WAS A BEEPING SOUND.

THE YOUNG WOMAN PRESSED HER FOREARM AND THE BEEP STOPPED. THE OTHERS
LOOKED AT HER QUESTIONINGLY .

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“THAT WAS MY PAGER, SHE SAID. I HAVE A MICROCHIP UNDER THE SKIN OF MY ARM .”

A FEW MINUTES LATER, A PHONE RANG. THE SECOND YOUNG WOMAN LIFTED HER PALM TO HER EAR. WHEN SHE FINISHED,SHE EXPLAINED, “THAT WAS MY MOBILE PHONE, I HAVE A MICROCHIP IN MY HAND.”

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THE BABY BOOMER FELT VERY LOW~TECH. NOT TO BE OUT DONE, SHE DECIDED SHE HAD TO DO SOMETHING JUST AS IMPRESSIVE. SHE STEPPED OUT OF THE SAUNA AND WENT TO THE BATHROOM. SHE RETURNED WITH A PIECE OF TOILET PAPER HANGING FROM HER REAR END.

THE OTHERS RAISED THEIR EYEBROWS AND STARED AT HER.

THE BABY BOOMER WOMAN FINALLY SAID……………….

” WELL, WILL YOU LOOK AT THAT…..I’M GETTING A FAX!!!”

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From NEW YORK, an outage has disconnected BlackBerry smart phones across North America.

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AT&T Inc. says the disruption Monday is affecting all wireless carriers. AT&T first learned about the problem at about 3:30 p.m. ET.

There’s no word on the cause or when the problem might be fixed.

BlackBerry maker Research in Motion did not immediately return a phone call.

Wikipedia has a new rival and it may seem to have a mountain to climb…you decide…you pic…you judge…

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VERSES

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Back in September 2006, Larry Sanger, philosopher and co~founder of Wikipedia, set up a rival online encyclopaedia, and called it Citizendium. Its mission: to rewrite Wikipedia without the accidental errors, the deliberate mischief or the endless internal factional disputes that turned some pages into the nasty nerd equivalent of old fashioned pissing contests.

Two thousand articles later, the ambitious scale of the task couldn’t be clearer, especially in the face of Wikipedia’s index of two million (and growing) articles. Some have argued the whole thing’s impractical; others that Citizendium’s unnecessary, that Wikipedia works well enough.

However, thanks to the recent actions of a 24 year old California Institute of Technology graduate student called Virgil Griffith, Wikipedia’s beginning to look damaged. Is Citizendium Wikipedia’s heir~in~waiting?

Wikipedia’s recent troubles came courtesy of an internet tool, developed by Griffith (a former hacker who also operates under the name Romanpoet), to show who’s editing what, and how.

WikiScanner sifts through Wikipedia’s anonymous edits, retrieves the IP addresses (the Web’s equivalent of fingerprints) associated with each edit and connects them back to large corporations and organisations, including Walmart, the CIA, the BBC and the Church of Scientology. It’s uncovered a long and growing list of suspect tampering.

Some of it is truly bizarre. Take, for instance, the ‘erotic spanking’ entry, edited from inside the IRS, the American tax agency, which details how a paddle hanging on a wall as a threat to the children might actually be ‘primarily used for erotic paddlings given by one spouse to the other. Presumably this isn’t IRS policy.

However, WikiScanner has also revealed Wikipedia’s dark side. Diebold, the private company responsible for electronic voting systems in the US, appears to have removed content critical of its technology. Al Jazeera has been linked to a host of anti-Semitic edits, including ‘Jews believe…they are better than other people’.

A wholesale removal of references to the Armenian genocide during the First World War has been traced directly to the Turkish Treasury, a worrying historical revision by an interested party.

Griffith himself defends Wikipedia, claiming that his invention will only help the encyclopedia by offering context to the minority of more politically sensitive entries. But there’s little doubt the reputation of Web 2.0’s greatest information repository has been damaged.

Most casual users would prefer to feel they can trust the website without resource to hacking tools, and have little time for a rarefied, though undoubtedly valid debate over the point at which one person’s facts become another’s propaganda. They want an authoritative source.

Which is exactly what Citizendium plans to offer. Like Wikipedia, Citizendium will be

authored by the people but authors will be compelled to register under their real names.

A volunteer police force will guard the encyclopedia from clear cases of deliberate vandalism. And volunteer editors, who will need to prove their qualifications will be charged with ensuring a high standard of content throughout and will be asked to give final editorial judgment in instances of factual dispute.

Citizendium’s not without controversy itself. Jimmy Wales, Sanger’s ex~partner on Wikipedia, will defend the Web 2.0 wisdom of crowds ethic to the end, in the firm belief that a good bust up between thousands will find the truth quicker than a single expert.

But editing at Wikipedia isn’t always about thousands, it’s often about a handful of highly motivated and highly vocal users. And we now know, since WikiScanner, that it’s about high powered propagandists, too.

Sanger, meanwhile, insists he isn’t denying the strength of the amateur, just defending the role of the expert in the era of our new and shiny, user~empowered internet.

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Thank you First Post and Linton Chiswick

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Here you go Baby Boomers…compare for your selves and infact write to Citizendium…new aurthors and writers are welcome. How cool is that???

Citizendium.org

or

Wikipedia.com

You decide!

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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Hello Baby Boomers,

Did you know that every 8.5 seconds a Baby Boomer turns “60”?

Did you know that in 1935 when Social Security started, that the average U.S. life expectancy was about 60…now it is 77.9!

Now a days, I call Social Security…Social INsecurity…! Can you dig it?

There is plenty of help out there for those exploring how to creat an active and fillfulling second act. Here are some web sites to check out.

Retirement-Planning Websites
www.2young2retire.com
Case histories and other resourses for and about late-life career changes.

www.aarp.org
Offers a five-part video, Mission Retirement

www.adultmentor.com
Workshops, conferences, courses, and publicationson retirement planning from veteran coach Richard L. Haid.

www.myplanafter50
Online coaching and other information for retirement planning.

www.fiveoclockclub.com
Network of career coaches.

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I hope this will help you…I will have more information soon…stay tuned!
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

Hello Baby Boomers

I have been having computer problems…someone sent me a NASTY VIRUS…thru Yahoo IM…so be careful out there…I will be up and running soon…

Stay tunned!

Smiles and world peace,
~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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From HELSINKI, Finland, Computer specialist Didier Stevens put up a simple text advertisement on the Internet offering downloads of a computer virus for people who did not have any.

Surprisingly, he found as many as 409 people clicking on the ad saying “Is your PC virus-free? Get it infected here!” during a 6-month advertising campaign on Google’s Adword, said the IT security expert.

“Some of them must have clicked on it by mistake. Some must have been curious or stupid,” said Mikko Hypponen, head of research at data security firm F-Secure.

There was no virus involved, it was an experiment aiming to show these kinds of advertising systems can be used for malicious intent, Stevens told Reuters.
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Thank you Reuters for this news item.
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125277887_e1f20c8d6b_m.jpgBILL GATES…

How the Internet took over
A QUARTER-CENTURY OF CHANGES

The Nation’s Newspaper turns 25 on Sept. 15, 2007. To help celebrate, we’ll revisit those years with 25 lists over the next 25 weeks. If your choices differ, let us know in the comments section below.

Twenty-five years ago the Internet as we now know it was in the process of being birthed by the National Science Foundation. Since then it’s been an information explosion. From e-mail to eBay, communication and shopping have forever changed.

1…World Wide Web

Tim Berners-Lee created user-friendly “Web pages” that could travel over the Internet, a network built to shuttle research between universities. The world logged on: 747 million adults in January.

2…E-mail

Tech’s answer to the Pony Express . Programs such as 1988’s Eudora made it easy to use. In-boxes have been filling up ever since. Nearly 97 billion e-mails are sent each day.

3…Graphical user interface (GUI)

Most computer displays were blinking lines of text until Apple featured clickable icons and other graphic tools in its 1984 Mac. Microsoft’s Windows took GUI pronounced “gooey” to the masses.

4…AOL

AOL turned people on to Web portals, chat rooms and instant messaging. Early subscribers paid by the hour. AOL once boasted 35 million subscribers. It bought Time Warner for $106 billion in 2001.

5…Broadband

The answer to the drip-drip-drip of dial-up, high-speed Internet service fuels online entertainment. About 78% of home Internet users in the U.S. have broadband, up from less than 1% in 1998.

6…Google

So popular it’s a verb. The search powerhouse, with a market capitalization of nearly $149 billion, perfected how we find info on the Web. Google sites had nearly 500 million visitors in December.

7…Mosaic/Netscape

Created by Marc Andreessen and others, Mosaic was the first widely-used multimedia Web browser. Spin-off Netscape Navigator ruled the ‘90s until Microsoft’s Internet Explorer took off around ‘98.

8…EBay

Thanks to eBay, we can all now buy and sell almost anything (skip the body parts). eBay has 230 million customers worldwide who engage in 100 million auctions at any given time.

9…Amazon.com

Jeff Bezos’ baby began as an always-in-stock book seller. It survived the tech bubble and now is the definitive big box online store. It was the second most-visited online retailer in December, after eBay.

10…Wi-fi

Have coffee shop, will compute: Wireless fidelity lets us lug our laptops out of the office and connect to the Net on the fly. More than 200 million Wi-Fi equipped products sold last year.

11…Instant Messaging

LOL! Web surfers began to “laugh out loud” and BRB (“be right back”) in the mid-‘90s, with the launch of ICQ and AOL Instant Messenger. Millions use it to swap messages and photos, even telephone pals.

12…Yahoo!

Stanford University graduate students Jerry Yang and David Filo created this popular Web portal in 1994. It remains a favorite for email, photo sharing (it owns Flickr) and other services.

13…Compuserve/Prodigy

In the 1980s, they became the first mainstream companies to offer consumer Internet access. CompuServe was more for the geek set; Prodigy was more for the masses.

14…The Well

The precursor for social networking, the Whole Earth ‘Lectronic Link, founded in 1985, was the original (now longest-running) virtual community. It gained popularity for its forums.

15…Vices

Regulators scrapped plans for a .xxx domain, but vice remains one of the Net’s biggest businesses. Online gambling, illegal in the U.S., topped $12 billion last year; online porn was $2.84 billion. Searches for “Paris Hilton video” return about a million hits.

16…Spam/Spyware

Unsolicited e-mail, and software that watches your Web habits, mushroomed from annoyance to menace. Junk e-mail now accounts for more than 9 of every 10 messages sent over the Internet.

17…Flash

Adobe’s Flash player is on 98% of all computers. Seen a video on YouTube or MySpace? Then you’ve probably used Flash. It animated the Web, spawning zillions of online cartoons and videos.

18…Online mapping tools

MapQuest started saving marriages in 1996 by offering turn-by-turn directions. Followers such as Yahoo and Google beam directions to cellphones and offer satellite images of neighborhoods.

19…Napster

Created in Shawn Fanning’s dorm room, Napster let more than 26 million people tap into a free database of music. Record companies shut it down. In its wake emerged legitimate download sites, such as Apple’s iTunes.

20…YouTube

The video-sharing site, bought by Google in 2006 for $1.65 billion, ignited a user-generated revolution online and introduced millions to the delights of Stephen Colbert, Chad Vader and Lonelygirl15.

21…The Drudge Report

Matt Drudge’s news site helped break the Monica Lewinsky story in 1998, paving the way for politically-minded bloggers everywhere. He claims to have about 500 million visitors a month.

22…Bloggers

The more than 75 million Web logs have changed how the world gets its news. Bloggers have challenged the traditional media, lobbied for and against wars, started debates, and posted far too many pictures of their pets.

23…Craigslist

Craig Newmark’s gathering place for (mostly) free classified ads changed the way we find apartments, cars and dates. The site relies on users who supply friendly neighborhood information — about 14 million ads a month.

24…MySpace

This online hangout has replaced the mall as a home away from home for teenagers. The site has more than 173 million personalized pages. News Corp paid $580 million for it in 2005.

25…Gaming and virtual worlds

More than 19 million globally pay to explore three-dimensional Massively Multiplayer Online (MMO) games such as World of Warcraft and virtual communities such as Second Life, which let players do business or just hang out. Both use the easy connections fostered by the Web to build communities.

By David Rae Morris, USA TODAY, Handout,
Next week… 25 Biggest Public Meltdowns

Thank you USA Today for giving this report to us…and all those who helped compile it.

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My sister will tell you that I fought the Internet and the computer for years!

I am not one for new gadgets…I hate cell phones and I have 3 digital cameras laying around somewhere…

I am a lover of ANTIQUES and so I live in the past…but if you took my computer away from me I would probably have a nervous break down.

Granted, I do love to read books…but the Internet…there is everything that you could possibly want to know and a lot you don’t want to know…out there.

Thank you, Bill Gates! [smile]

Smiles and world peace,

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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