Asci Berry


Lupus Triggers

1582532894_40578ad512_m.jpg Wear PURPLE for LUPUS awareness…


Hormones

Hormones are chemical substances secreted by the cells of the endocrine system that regulate bodily functions. Males have sex hormones known as androgens and women’s sex hormones include estrogens and progestins.

Most experts agree that the hormone estrogen has an impact on lupus, however there is not the be~al~end~all explanation for lupus flares. It is known that increased levels of estrogen can cause lupus flares, but it does not always do so for every patient. In fact, in pregnant lupus patients – when estrogen increases 100 fold beyond menstrual estrogen levels, flares are actually uncommon. Still, during menopause estrogen levels fall to immeasurable levels, and lupus activity becomes milder.

Many women with lupus have low levels of progesterone and androgen, which can then compound the effect estrogen has on immune system cells. Also, prolactin levels are often seen in men with SLE and also in some women. Prolactin, the hormone that triggers the production of breast milk, can stimulate the immune system, and increased levels of prolactin are found in about 20 percent of people with lupus5.

The University of Missouri School of Biological Sciences recently completed some studies regarding the effect of estrogen in the immune cells of patients with lupus. They found that estrogen binds to the receptor on the immune cell, activating a signal that increases autoimmune cell activity. It is this activity that increases the production of more autoantibodies that can cause damage to organs and other tissues.

1751262149_485b2a3fa8_m.jpg Done by Artist for Lupus Contestant…

While estrogen is highly linked to lupus flares, it should be noted that men do get lupus, too. Androgens and progestins are often higher in men, and they act as immune system suppressants. Therefore, it is theorized that men who have lupus also have an imbalance of the estrogen~to~androgen ratio. However, more study is needed to determine the hormonal relationship in men with lupus.

There is some concern that taking HRT during menopause can cause memory loss. However, estrogen impacts the activity and connectivity of certain neurons in the brain. The hormone can effect behavior and mood. A recent study by Columbia University demonstrated that some women who take estrogen during post-menopause my experience a delay in Alzheimer’s disease onset or decrease their risk of developing the disease.
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Thank you Freedom From Lupus
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I am a Lupus survivior…the only thing that has EVER helped me witht his disease is Mona Vie. You may contact me if you would like further infornmation about what it is and how it has helped me. I will hold your information private.

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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What is Lupus?

It’s been said that understanding Lupus means understanding medicine. Lupus, also known by its formal name “Lupus Erythematosus,” is caused by factors that reflect the core of immune system functioning. Still, Lupus is actually difficult to diagnose. While over one million people suffer from Lupus in the US alone, it is a little publicized disease – despite the fact that it has more sufferers than leukemia, multiple sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, and muscular dystrophy combined.

Systemic Lupus

The simplest way to explain lupus is that the body becomes allergic to itself. The immune system overreacts to stimuli, resulting in too many antibodies being produced. This autoimmune disease then causes the high number of antibodies to attack normal tissue. While there are several different types of Lupus…including Systemic, Discoid, Neonatal, and Drug-Induced Lupus. Systemic Lupus is the most common form.

Systemic Lupus (SLE) is diagnosed by using specific criteria determined by the American College of Rheumatology. Despite the fact that he criteria are outlined, it can actually take along time to diagnose. While some tests help in the diagnosis, there is no one definitive test for SLE.

SLE symptoms can appear on the skin, as can be seen by the first four criteria. It can also cause major damage to the internal organs, as noted in the systemic criteria. Finally, the diagnosis is usually confirmed via at least one of the laboratory criteria, most often through the antinuclear antibody test, or ANA. While the ANA test tells a physician that there is a potential autoimmune disease, it does not give a definitive Lupus diagnosis alone. While 4 out of the 11 criteria are usually required for a lupus diagnosis, there are rare occasions when a diagnosis can be made with less.
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Thank you Freedom from Lupus
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Hello Baby Boomers

Though I am not a Doctor…I am a survivor if Lupus or should that read with Lupus…

If there is anything that I can help you with…PLEASE contact me…on or off line.

Though out my blog there are all kinds of reports on Lupus…just do a search.

What has helped me the most and a HUGE world of difference to me and my health is Mona Vie…I attack Lupus thru a NON-PHARMACUETICAL approach…since I am one of the Drug Induced Lupus Survivors.

http://www.MyMonaVie.com/SharonSutley

An ounce of prevention could save lives…I want it to be YOURS!!! ~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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Miriam Falco, Managing Editor, Medical News, has prepared a lot CNN segments on preventing illness over the last seven years as a medical producer..but according to a new study she has come across…not enough of us are getting the message. Not even some doctors.

Our health-care system is not necessarily geared toward prevention. But what if it were?

We need to make prevention the cornerstone of America’s health-care system. “Too many people are dying prematurely or living with disease that could have been prevented,” Coffield says. “We could get more out of our health-care dollars if more preventive measures were taken. We can pay now or pay a lot more later.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention commissioned a report to determine which preventive measures would have the biggest impact in saving lives. The non-profit health policy group “Partnership for Prevention” (PFP) found that simply increasing the number of people who follow 5 existing prevention recommendations would save more than a 100,000 lives each year. That’s more than the population of Green Bay, Wisconsin or Cambridge, Massachusetts.

So what exactly are these five recommendations?

1** Right now less than half of Americans who should be taking aspirin daily to prevent heart disease do so. If that number went up to 90 percent, 45,000 additional lives would be saved, at a cost of pennies a day.

2** Only about a quarter of all smokers are advised by health care professionals to quit smoking and given tools to do so. If that number were raised to 90 percent of smokers, then 42,000 additional lives would be saved each year.

3** Less than half of Americans older than 50 get screened for colon cancer, get that number up to 90 percent and 14,000 additional lives could be saved.

4** Each year the CDC says get your flu shot, but only 37 percent of adults older than 50 actually get one. Raising that stat up to 90 percent would save 12,000 more lives.

5** Finally, only two-thirds of women older than 40 get screened for cancer every 2 years…if that number increased to 90 percent, almost 4,000 lives would be saved annually.

So why aren’t more of us taking aspirin, quitting smoking or getting cancer screenings?

Maybe it’s because many of us don’t think about going to the doctor when we are healthy, but go only when we’re sick. According to the PFP report, many doctors and nurses lack a system to track the patients who need preventive care. And when it comes to telling patients to quit smoking, some doctors aren’t always comfortable doing so.

Another hurdle is the cost of preventive services. In many cases, high deductibles have to be met before preventive medicine is covered by insurance. Those who don’t have insurance are even more likely not to go to the doctor if they aren’t sick. They probably can’t afford it. Something has to change. One of the study’s authors, Ashley Coffield says it’s important to remove financial restraints in order to increase demand for more preventive services.

Have you been screened for cancer? Can you afford to go to the doctor when you’re not sick? What preventive measures do you take to stay healthy?

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Thank you CNN and Miriam Falco, Managing Editor, Medical News
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How many of you eat 5-7 fruits a day?
JUST another way to prevent many pit falls in your health.

With todays fruits being picked before they are even ripe 5-7 fruits…will not cut the mustard any more.

I am probably one of the few people who eat the required daily fruits but I know that this is not enough by todays fruit standards.

Do you remember the old adage “an apple a day keeps the doctor away???” Your body needs your fruits to stay healthy!

What I do, is drink Mona Vie. It has 18 fruits, including its number one ingredient, the number one (1) super food in the world…the Asci Berry. It has been a god send to me.

http//www.MyMonaVie.com/SharonSutley

Thanks for reading my blog.
Smiles and world peace,
~The Baby Boomer Queen~