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Hello Baby Boomers…here’s some more interesting information about the Asci Berry and I included a couple other notes and recipes as well of interest.

    Wonder Foods

Here’s why these three foods are practically a staple among health – conscious celebs and foodies – plus how to pronounce them, so you can casually order an Açaí Smoothie with all the cool of George Clooney.

Açaí berries (ah-sigh-EE or ah-SIGH-ee)

Brazilian surfers eat theirs with granola, and we know what their bodies look like! Packed with twice the disease-fighting antioxidants of blueberries, açaí has already made Oprah’s list of Top 10 Superfoods and The Washington Post called the blackberry-flavored fruit the “new pomegranate.”

But you may find it easier to sip yours: Celestial Seasonings sells an açaí-green tea blend, and açaí martinis are on chic bar menus everywhere.

DIY açaí fruit soda: Just mix chilled sparkling mineral water with a few ounces of açaí juice, available at health-food stores. Sip. Look cool. Feel healthy.

Quinoa (KEEN-wah)

Dry quinoa looks a bit like sesame seeds but when cooked it becomes fluffy with a hint of crunch, making it an excellent substitution for rice, cous cous, and pasta.

Quinoa’s major claim to food fame, however, is what RealAge researchers call its “nutritional profile.” A cup of quinoa has more protein than a quarter-pound hamburger and more calcium than a quart of milk.

Yowza.

It’s also loaded with iron, magnesium, and a bevy of other minerals and B vitamins. No wonder the Incas named it “the mother grain.” Try it in this warm winter salad from our friends at Eating Well.

Quinoa and Black Beans
Stir in your favorite jarred salsa for extra zing.
This is also good the next day for lunch.
Makes 2 servings, about 1/2 cup each

1 teaspoon canola oil
1/2 bell pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons chopped red onion
1/2 cup canned black beans, rinsed
2 tablespoons broth (or water)
1/2 cup hot quinoa (cook according to package directions)

Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add bell pepper and onion and cook until almost tender. Add beans and broth (or water) to the pan. Cook until heated through. Stir in quinoa.

Per serving: 162 calories; 4 g fat (0 g sat); 0 mg cholesterol; 27 g carbohydrate; 6 g protein; 4 g fiber; 60 mg sodium; 224 mg potassium.

Matcha (MAH-cha)

When you drink a cuppa matcha (also spelled maccha), you’re getting green tea’s powerful antioxidants to the max, because you’re actually consuming the whole green tea leaf in powdered form.

In Japan, slightly bitter matcha is traditionally served syrupy thick. But in the US, you’ll find matcha stirred into lattes, sprinkled on ice cream, and used to bolster energy drinks and turn smoothies into pick-me-ups (it’s said to boost alertness). Just be respectful of matcha if you’re caffeine sensitive: Ounce for ounce, it has almost as much caffeine as coffee.

To rev up a hot homemade latte, whisk in 1/2 teaspoon of the powder.
For a quick summer cooler, blend 1 1/2 teaspoon with a cup of milk and some ice cubes.

Thanks to Beauty Age for the assistance in posing this information

If I can assist you with anything else…please contact ME…

~The Baby Boomer Queen~

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